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Author Topic: Do you purposly keyword mistakes?  (Read 4765 times)

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« Reply #25 on: December 15, 2012, 06:00 »
0
for a koala I use the keyword "bear". It is not a bear but my job is not educate but to sell and meet their needs. For a very young koala I have used the keyword "cub" and had the image rejected by the reviewer. "Cub" is correct "bear" is not. Not my job to make it difficult for buyers or to educate reviewers.


ShadySue

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« Reply #26 on: December 15, 2012, 08:04 »
0
Yes, I do this and I do it often.  I also intentionally misspell keywords - as an example Blond = Blonde
That isn't misspelling.  One is the english spelling and one is the american spelling.
Interesting, I didn't know that. I thought blonde was for a female, and blond was for a male, from the French. That's how I use them, anyway, FWIW.  ::)

« Reply #27 on: December 15, 2012, 08:05 »
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A tomato is technically a fruit.. does that mean you should leave out the keyword vegetable?  In reality it seems like spam to use the keyword fruit as buyers will most likely be searching for vegetable and tomato if the image is of a tomato you eat.
How about if you have a shot of a Mule, would you use the keyword Donkey?  They aren't the same animal.
Or if you had a spider, would you keyword it with insect?
How about shooting a heifer, would you keyword with cow? A heifer isn't a cow


Tomato - yes - I would, keyword "vegetable".

Mule - is not a "donkey", I would leave that one out.

Spider - not an insect, I would leave that one out. if someone searches for "insect", I'm pretty sure there are already enough REAL insect pictures to choose from.

Heifer - If I understand correctly, a heifer is a young cow. So keywording "cow" would be totally right. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heifer

I try to include both spellings (british/american) and some misspellings like plural for tomato is both "tomatoes" and "tomatos"
« Last Edit: December 15, 2012, 08:25 by Perry »

« Reply #28 on: December 15, 2012, 08:21 »
+1
for a koala I use the keyword "bear". It is not a bear but my job is not educate but to sell and meet their needs. For a very young koala I have used the keyword "cub" and had the image rejected by the reviewer. "Cub" is correct "bear" is not. Not my job to make it difficult for buyers or to educate reviewers.

I think you should not keyword "bear", but "koala" and "koala bear". (if an agency's systems separates the words it's their problem!)

« Reply #29 on: December 15, 2012, 08:29 »
+1
I've had quite a few instances where agencies have emailed me asking about the specifics of a photo - often to do with location.  I took some images on the prairies and they were in Saskatchewan, but Montana, parts of Alberta, Manitoba, North Dakota all look exactly the same - especially at a distance.  I have often included other prairie provinces / states in the keywords.  Perhaps that was wrong?? But as I said customers do ask when the need to confirm that the image is indeed from Saskatchewan and I am also careful to keep the title and description as accurate as possible (informing / educating the buyer)

If you are doing this in keywords then make sure the description text clearly identifies the location. "Ohio Magazine" cannot use a Michigan photo or the readers will catch it.  I sell quite a few location specific photos to regional outlets. Enough that I include locations even where the image would likely not require a location (e.g. close-up of a native animal).  A Rhino in Ohio, USA, is very possible, and within context, when it is at the Wildlife Farm/Preserve/Zoo.  However that Rhino may not fit a travel guide article for Africa as the background vegetation would eventually be noted as wrong.

I have had inquiries about an Ohio farm picture as to exactly where in Ohio. Turns out a state publication was confirming really in Ohio and apparently was trying to make some uniform photo coverage from around the state.  So I very often include a near city in the description of landscapes and such. That farm picture then got bought and used for numerous Ohio related state publications.

« Reply #30 on: December 15, 2012, 08:47 »
+2
I don't think you should keyword wrong locations at all. If they buyer thinks that a country or state near by will do, he/she propapbly can search for it.

As a buyer I get very upset when "wrong" images pop up when I'm searching. Thanks to keyword spammers, many times the wrong images are a majority in search results. Yes, the sellers might get a few extra sales, but as a whole keyword spamming is a huge problem. In the long run accurate search results benefits us all.
« Last Edit: December 15, 2012, 08:51 by Perry »

« Reply #31 on: December 15, 2012, 16:35 »
+1
I agree that locations should be correct. It always bothers me when someone keywords 3 or 4 national parks for an image that was clearly from only one of them - same for tropical islands, etc.

I always try to be more specific in the description.

Sometimes I include the nearest big town.

I don't include insect for a spider, but I will check insect as a category if there are no other options.

I try to include UK and USA spellings when I remember.

« Reply #32 on: December 15, 2012, 18:54 »
+1
One of my absolute hates is the ones where its keyworded

fiji,somoa,tahiti,hawaii,tonga,etc.   

Unless your in the space station with a wide angle lens your not going to have all of that in one shot.


 

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