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Author Topic: Journalist launches PicFair as image licence marketplace  (Read 39150 times)

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« on: July 29, 2013, 16:20 »
+1


« Reply #1 on: July 29, 2013, 17:53 »
+1
Just had a look and signed up.  Seems pretty cool.  Interesting that there are no advertising usages allowed, just editorial.  You set the price and keep 100% of the sale.  The buyer pays your asking price plus a 10% fee and a small processing charge.  The upload functionality at this point looks to be only one image at a time tho.

ShadySue

« Reply #2 on: July 29, 2013, 17:59 »
+1
Looks interesting.
Looks like an RM editorial licence, but I can't see the terms RM or RF; probably right under my nose somewhere.

« Reply #3 on: July 29, 2013, 18:00 »
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interesting interview as well

<a href="http://youtu.be/xhGWc21m0FM" target="_blank" class="aeva_link bbc_link new_win">http://youtu.be/xhGWc21m0FM</a>

« Reply #4 on: July 29, 2013, 18:10 »
0
Looks interesting.
Looks like an RM editorial licence, but I can't see the terms RM or RF; probably right under my nose somewhere.

Not really RF or RM.  The buyer is allowed to use the image for one project only, unlimited print run and size.

CD123

« Reply #5 on: July 29, 2013, 19:25 »
+1
So everyone jumps into this one, including the happy snappy camera phone bunch...? So they will have 500 000 000 pictures by the end of the year and no one will be able to search through all the crap to find a decent picture?  :-\

PS Thanx for the interesting post Luis.

gillian vann

  • *Gillian*
« Reply #6 on: July 29, 2013, 20:26 »
0
v interesting interview - he does bag out iS and SS as being "boring", can't say I agree with that. i wonder how much junk his site will be flooded with, plus the inappropriate keywording that inevitably happens, rendering the search useless.

gillian vann

  • *Gillian*
« Reply #7 on: July 29, 2013, 20:28 »
+2
why doesn't Instagram just add a 'buy this' option?

« Reply #8 on: July 29, 2013, 20:31 »
+1
the 100% royalties do look good, I see a better collection comparing to the usual mobile agencies but still soon to drop any conclusion, for now its just a new marketplace, I will follow their "progress"

« Reply #9 on: July 29, 2013, 20:39 »
0
The license seems similar to "editorial", images cannot be used for advertising.

gillian vann

  • *Gillian*
« Reply #10 on: July 29, 2013, 20:39 »
+1
it's not our concern, cos we know better :), but the average person may not understand they can't sell commercial images of other people with a MR, and it's not explained very well on the site.

modify: oh, really? i'll have to read a bit more closely then.

modify: ah, when you click to purchase the info is there. big, bold text in yellow highlights no less. (google could learn something from these guys)
« Last Edit: July 29, 2013, 20:42 by gillian »

« Reply #11 on: July 29, 2013, 21:08 »
0
"PicFair users create an account and upload images, setting the price as they see fit. Visitors to the site do not need to sign up and can buy a licence for the image directly through the page. PicFair takes 10 per cent commission on top of the image price and Stripe, the PayPal alternative used by PicFair, charge 3.3 per cent plus 30 pence per purchase."

Whoop de doo.  Another stock agency that bypasses the need for model release or quality checks because it is "editorial", just like Scoopshot.

"In what PicFair's founder Benji Lanyado describes as "three clicks" for copyright holders between signing up and putting images on the market"

Really?  Which of those clicks is responsible for adding keywords so the image can be found?

"For decades, image licensing has been controlled by multinational agencies, who take copyright from photographers, and the lion's share of the royalties."

I don't know any agency that takes copyright from a photographer.

"Picfair has one licence to rule them all"

There's absolutely nothing original or unique here.  The license agreement specifies one use only - no big deal, you can specify whatever you like when you make your own license.  Do it for your Symbiostock license.  Specify whatever you like.  Besides, there's already micros that specify you must buy another license for each use.

All micros have one license, plus additional licenses if you need the flexibility.  How is restricting opportunities for the buyer to spend money for what they want, good?
« Last Edit: July 29, 2013, 21:10 by Sean Locke Photography »

« Reply #12 on: July 29, 2013, 21:28 »
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guess it is 3 clicks to license a picture

« Reply #13 on: July 29, 2013, 22:03 »
0
plus hundred keystrokes to type some keywords. The software can't read the keywords in the image file.

« Reply #14 on: July 29, 2013, 22:24 »
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Quote
"For decades, image licensing has been controlled by multinational agencies, who take copyright from photographers, and the lion's share of the royalties."

I don't know any agency that takes copyright from a photographer.

Well, technically some agencies don't take the copyrights from photographers, but they remove the EXIF data, including photographer's name and copyright notice.

Beppe Grillo

« Reply #15 on: July 29, 2013, 23:47 »
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No ftp upload, or I missed it?

« Reply #16 on: July 30, 2013, 00:39 »
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Interesting.  Could be a huge success, and could be a flop.  Certainly worth keeping an eye on.  If the site really does not read IPTC, I would bet on the "flop" side.


« Reply #17 on: July 30, 2013, 04:58 »
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by the way, who's gonna stop scammers from selling pirated photos on PicFair ?

« Reply #18 on: July 30, 2013, 05:01 »
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why doesn't Instagram just add a 'buy this' option?

legal and copyright reasons.

for starters they've no idea who the uploaders are and if they legally own the photos, not to mention the lack of model/property releases and all the other eventual scams, it would be a can of worms for FB and they didnt bought Instagram for that.

« Reply #19 on: July 30, 2013, 05:05 »
+1
why doesn't Instagram just add a 'buy this' option?


legal and copyright reasons.

for starters they've no idea who the uploaders are and if they legally own the photos, not to mention the lack of model/property releases and all the other eventual scams, it would be a can of worms for FB and they didnt bought Instagram for that.


Yet, you have this site, that appears to inherently trust random unknown twitter users:
http://www.pdnonline.com/news/Startup-Aims-to-Make-8462.shtml?utm_source=Silverpop&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=42155636&utm_term=96312&utm_content

All these little startups that seem to miss the point that the reason buyers shop at established locations or with known photographers, is to avoid any legal issues.  Otherwise, they might as well just grab stuff from google.

EmberMike

« Reply #20 on: July 30, 2013, 07:52 »
0
Whoop de doo.  Another stock agency that bypasses the need for model release or quality checks because it is "editorial", just like Scoopshot...

My thought exactly. These companies keep taking shots at Shutterstock, istock, Getty, etc., in their pitches but really they are not offering a real alternative. Last I heard, non-editorial content was still outselling editorial by a large margin, because that's what people need. If nothing on PicFair can be used in advertising, it's pretty useless for a lot of buyers.

« Reply #21 on: July 30, 2013, 08:07 »
0
Whoop de doo.  Another stock agency that bypasses the need for model release or quality checks because it is "editorial", just like Scoopshot...

My thought exactly. These companies keep taking shots at Shutterstock, istock, Getty, etc., in their pitches but really they are not offering a real alternative. Last I heard, non-editorial content was still outselling editorial by a large margin, because that's what people need. If nothing on PicFair can be used in advertising, it's pretty useless for a lot of buyers.
The editorial market is looking so over supplied and lacking in demand its not worth looking at

« Reply #22 on: July 30, 2013, 08:27 »
+1
I'll probably give them a go.  Alamy do OK with editorial and I'm sure Getty do much better.  I'm interested in sites that aren't the same as the ones we already have.

Dan

« Reply #23 on: July 30, 2013, 08:54 »
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     Agree  with  sharpshot

EmberMike

« Reply #24 on: July 30, 2013, 09:15 »
0

If someone can figure out how to cover the legal issues on a platform like this, that's a goldmine. They need to work releases into the system. Like you snap a photo on your phone and you can immediately get a digitally-signed release on the spot from any person in the photo. Although even that has it's issues. I'm not sure what the answer is, but what I've seen so far doesn't solve any problems or introduce anything game-changing.


 

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