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Author Topic: monitor brightness for post processing  (Read 3767 times)

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« on: September 11, 2010, 05:22 »
0
Hi all,

I have a question that should we adjust our monitor brightness to the maximum during photoshop post process? or you use the histogram chart rather than eye?


« Reply #1 on: September 11, 2010, 05:34 »
0
Hi all,

I have a question that should we adjust our monitor brightness to the maximum during photoshop post process? or you use the histogram chart rather than eye?

I use 120cd/m, it's the recommended value with my eye one display calibrator device.

« Reply #2 on: September 11, 2010, 18:55 »
0
I find 120cd/m2 to be too bright for printing, so I calibrate lower.
But I do go by the histogram to avoid blowing out highlights or blocking up shadows too much.

I am fairly certain that the inspectors will be looking at your histograms for those same things.

RacePhoto

« Reply #3 on: September 13, 2010, 00:02 »
0
Hi all,

I have a question that should we adjust our monitor brightness to the maximum during photoshop post process? or you use the histogram chart rather than eye?


Huey Pro calibrated

I don't care how much someone thinks they can calibrate by eye, since perceptions change, it's never going to be consistent. Room lighting changes which means your brightness needs to change if it's daytime, nighttime or what lights you have on. I still use a calibrated CRT because of the colors being true. I'm sure some of the expensive LCDs are excellent now, I just done have bags full of cash to buy one. :)

Try this test and see if your monitor has enough range and shows differences at the ends of the scale. (Monitor Black Point test)

http://www.drycreekphoto.com/Learn/Calibration/monitor_black.htm

If your monitor isn't capable of showing what you need to see, accurately, adjusting doesn't make much sense because it's a waste of time.

« Reply #4 on: September 13, 2010, 00:31 »
0
oic, thank you for the link, my screen can only see the black from level 5..

Hi all,

I have a question that should we adjust our monitor brightness to the maximum during photoshop post process? or you use the histogram chart rather than eye?


Huey Pro calibrated

I don't care how much someone thinks they can calibrate by eye, since perceptions change, it's never going to be consistent. Room lighting changes which means your brightness needs to change if it's daytime, nighttime or what lights you have on. I still use a calibrated CRT because of the colors being true. I'm sure some of the expensive LCDs are excellent now, I just done have bags full of cash to buy one. :)

Try this test and see if your monitor has enough range and shows differences at the ends of the scale. (Monitor Black Point test)

http://www.drycreekphoto.com/Learn/Calibration/monitor_black.htm

If your monitor isn't capable of showing what you need to see, accurately, adjusting doesn't make much sense because it's a waste of time.

RacePhoto

« Reply #5 on: September 13, 2010, 00:42 »
0
Interesting isn't it? I've sent it to some friends who had big expensive LCDs and they were 4 or 5 starting. Make sure you have a soft lighting, diffused or even better indirect light, and try it again.  I don't want to get into the whole thing I do when I'm editing for color and want to be critical. It's a single light, daylight balanced 6200K bulb, aimed up at the ceiling, and I work at night. I'm not sure if a little single malt helps as well? ;) Whatever works for anyone else, is fine with me. That's just my choice, plus the phone doesn't ring much from Midnight until 5AM?

[edit] I just noticed the printing part, and I don't print anything myself anymore. I only use the calibrated monitor for editing digital for distribution or for sale.


oic, thank you for the link, my screen can only see the black from level 5..

Hi all,

I have a question that should we adjust our monitor brightness to the maximum during photoshop post process? or you use the histogram chart rather than eye?


Huey Pro calibrated

I don't care how much someone thinks they can calibrate by eye, since perceptions change, it's never going to be consistent. Room lighting changes which means your brightness needs to change if it's daytime, nighttime or what lights you have on. I still use a calibrated CRT because of the colors being true. I'm sure some of the expensive LCDs are excellent now, I just done have bags full of cash to buy one. :)

Try this test and see if your monitor has enough range and shows differences at the ends of the scale. (Monitor Black Point test)

http://www.drycreekphoto.com/Learn/Calibration/monitor_black.htm

If your monitor isn't capable of showing what you need to see, accurately, adjusting doesn't make much sense because it's a waste of time.

« Last Edit: September 13, 2010, 12:15 by RacePhoto »

« Reply #6 on: September 13, 2010, 02:51 »
0
I find 120cd/m2 to be too bright for printing

That depends on how bright your lighting in your room is. I brightened my lighting a bit when I changed from CRT to flat screen.


 

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