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Author Topic: Selling exclusive Usage Rights  (Read 6629 times)

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« on: May 19, 2009, 12:43 »
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I'm looking for people who sold exclusive usage rights to one or more of their images before.

Please PM me.


« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2009, 13:21 »
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Please PM me.

Why? Can't we all know it?  :-[

« Reply #2 on: May 19, 2009, 13:31 »
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I'm looking for people who sold exclusive usage rights to one or more of their images before.

Please PM me.

Sure but obviously not anything that's ever been micro.

« Reply #3 on: May 19, 2009, 13:35 »
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Why? Can't we all know it?  :-[

I don't want to see a "discussion" with people claiming to know better without having sold exclusive usage rights before.
Too many trolls here that don't contribute anything constructive.

Also, the ones who did sell exclusive usage rights would be hesitant posting details on a public forum.

Nothing personal.

« Reply #4 on: May 19, 2009, 13:38 »
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I don't want to see a "discussion" with people claiming to know better without having sold exclusive usage rights before.
Too many trolls here that don't contribute anything constructive.
Nothing personal.

Find a dating site then. This is a forum.
Nothing personal.

« Reply #5 on: May 19, 2009, 13:40 »
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I don't want to see a "discussion" with people claiming to know better without having sold exclusive usage rights before.
Too many trolls here that don't contribute anything constructive.
Nothing personal.

Find a dating site then. This is a forum.
Nothing personal.


That's what I'm talking about.

Thanks for your "help".

lisafx

« Reply #6 on: May 19, 2009, 16:32 »
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Just giving this one a bump.  I am interested in the answer if anyone has done this. 

The only offers I ever had were to completely sell the rights.  Since most of my images are people I wouldn't be interested in that.  But I might consider selling exclusive usage rights without letting go of the copyright. 

Don't a couple of the agencies offer this as an extended license option? 

WarrenPrice

« Reply #7 on: May 19, 2009, 17:07 »
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@lisafx  Isn't that what the SR-EL license is at Dreamstime? 
I remember seeing a thread fairly recently about someone selling all rights.  Seems like her share was just under $500.

Also, I think you can sell all right even after the image has sold under other "restricted" micro licenses.  It just requires deleting the image from further availability.

Am I missing something?

Follow is the SR-EL agreement copied from Dreamstime:

Sell the Rights (SR-EL):
This license represents a full ownership of the downloaded image. The buyer can use it exclusively (exclusivity applies from the moment that the file was downloaded using this license), and include it in any type of design with just a few restrictions: sensitive subjects may still apply and the buyer may not claim that the file was created by him nor resell it as a photo.
The agency will disable the image immediately after the buyer acquired this license. The photographer is required to disable the file permanently from all other places where he may sell it, as soon as possible after the sale occured, but no longer than 72 hours. The photographer acknowledge and agrees to provide the buyer with full ownership for the file retrieved using the SR-EL license.

If a Model Release is available on file, it will remain within our database, a proof about its existence can be forwarded to the buyer, however, the MR info will still not be disclosed in respect of the photographers' and models' privacy.
This is an additional license to the rights included within the regular Royalty-Free license.

For any other details regarding usage or these licenses, you are strongly advised to contact Dreamstime.

« Reply #8 on: May 19, 2009, 17:24 »
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@lisafx  Isn't that what the SR-EL license is at Dreamstime? 

Yes, that is correct.

I would like to have somebody who sold the exclusive USAGE rights NOT the copyright to respond to me via PM.

Thanks.

« Reply #9 on: May 19, 2009, 17:29 »
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   Well, I don't know if this is what you're talking about, but I make my living by selling photographs, with exclusive rights, to advertising agencies. Of course, these are commissioned assignments. My agent usually quotes two prices, one for limited usage, and one for exclusive ownership. The ad agencies always choose the exclusive rate, which I love, because it's the higher of the two prices. I've never sold one of my stock images for exclusive use, but only because I've never been asked. I would though. Everything is negotiable.

« Reply #10 on: May 19, 2009, 17:34 »
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   Well, I don't know if this is what you're talking about, but I make my living by selling photographs, with exclusive rights, to advertising agencies. Of course, these are commissioned assignments. My agent usually quotes two prices, one for limited usage, and one for exclusive ownership. The ad agencies always choose the exclusive rate, which I love, because it's the higher of the two prices. I've never sold one of my stock images for exclusive use, but only because I've never been asked. I would though. Everything is negotiable.

I understand that this is how it works when you do assignments.

I'm sitting in a different boat now. Obviously the potential buyer doesn't mind if the images have been sold RF so far. Naturally, in case there is a deal I would have to take them down from the agencies.

« Reply #11 on: May 19, 2009, 18:15 »
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I would suggest taking into account some of the following:

- How much you have earned from the image and how long it has been online?  From that you can figure out an approximate annual rate that you have earned (or might earn) on the image.  Obviously, if the image is relatively new (only a few months), then that will make it harder.

- Are there similar images to this one also available from your collection?  If so, then you the buyer might want you to remove all of the similars as well, and you should calculate the rate of return on these images also.

- Pick a period of time that you feel the image might sell over.  It seems to be the experience of many here, that the sales on an image reduce over time (since they get lost in the haystack and there are boatloads more loaded every week).  For example, you might choose 5 or 10 years.  Then multiply this time frame by the annual rate of return that you previously calculated.  This should give you a ballpark figure.

- Factor in your time.  As they say: "Time is money".

- Add in a fudge factor, since they might want to "bargain" with you.  For example, if you ask for $500, they might offer back $250.  Take this into account.

- Where are they located?  If you give them a quote in $USD, and they are located in another country, there will be a conversion rate that they might need to apply.  This might make the image seem more expensive or inexpensive to them, depending on the country.

- What are their plans for the image?  How big is the company that you are dealing with?  Do they plan on using it as a logo?

Of course, after having said all of that, you need to feel comfortable selling the rights on an image.  Many people have an attraction to the images that they have created and have a problem parting with them.

Hope that helps...


WarrenPrice

« Reply #12 on: May 19, 2009, 18:23 »
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@lisafx  Isn't that what the SR-EL license is at Dreamstime? 

Yes, that is correct.

I would like to have somebody who sold the exclusive USAGE rights NOT the copyright to respond to me via PM.

Thanks.

Sorry, Just another Troll responding to a specific person (LisaFX) concerning a specific question.  My apologies for interrupting your thread.


« Reply #13 on: May 19, 2009, 18:24 »
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How would this work with images that are online on some sites where there is a lock in period? It is impossible to take down an image within 72 hours as DT license requires.

« Reply #14 on: May 19, 2009, 18:27 »
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@lisafx  Isn't that what the SR-EL license is at Dreamstime? 

Yes, that is correct.

I would like to have somebody who sold the exclusive USAGE rights NOT the copyright to respond to me via PM.

Thanks.

Can you please be more specific? I don't see how this could be done with micro. It seems to be the realm of RM. Is this what you are referring to? And what sort of rights? There are regional, industry specific, time, media type etc.

WarrenPrice

« Reply #15 on: May 19, 2009, 18:35 »
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How would this work with images that are online on some sites where there is a lock in period? It is impossible to take down an image within 72 hours as DT license requires.

I'm not sure either, GA, how that works but I think it is an agreement between the agencies.  That point was mentioned in the thread that I referenced about the lady selling the S-EL image.  I think it is just a matter of "disabling" the images until they can be taken down.  That might be a good question to raise at the DT site?




« Reply #16 on: May 19, 2009, 18:40 »
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OK, now since this is getting completely out of hand - here you go:

A buyer (who shall remain anonymous - I hope no more trolls have a problem with that...) wants some of my images exclusively. These images in question are on the micros.

OBVIOUSLY these images have already sold many times.

The buyer knows that!!!

STILL the buyer is interested in getting exclusive usage rights, NOT COPYRIGHT

I have gotten my answers already thanks to people who PMed me as I asked.

Once I have news about this topic I will post everything about it so nobody feels left out.





« Reply #17 on: May 19, 2009, 18:50 »
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   Well, I don't know if this is what you're talking about, but I make my living by selling photographs, with exclusive rights, to advertising agencies. Of course, these are commissioned assignments. My agent usually quotes two prices, one for limited usage, and one for exclusive ownership. The ad agencies always choose the exclusive rate, which I love, because it's the higher of the two prices. I've never sold one of my stock images for exclusive use, but only because I've never been asked. I would though. Everything is negotiable.

What do you ask?  I just quoted $900 an image licensing rights for exclusive use for 3 years to someone.

« Reply #18 on: May 19, 2009, 18:54 »
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   If it is to be used as a small "spot" on a package, $500 - $700, is the norm. A full blown overall package usually gets $2000 -$3500. These are exclusive prices. The bigger the client's name recognition, the more you can charge. If your having a bad year, you lower your price. Just keep in mind, that once you negotiate a price, if the client comes back for more, they will expect future prices to stay in line.

« Reply #19 on: May 19, 2009, 18:57 »
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I think the all time records is around a $125,000 for the splash screen to Windows 97. I could be wrong about the amount and the exact copy of Windows but you Windows users know the shot of the green field and blue sky. The amount is about right. It really depends on the industry and how widespread the usage is. $10,000 is not unreasonable for larger usages. Ask for it next time, you'll be surprised what you can get.


 

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