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Author Topic: Slower Sales starts soon for us  (Read 7630 times)

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« Reply #25 on: July 21, 2017, 04:47 »
0
But in Italy nobody buys stock stuff even the rest of the year, so it is not a factor in this market

Based on what? I have lots of content from Italy, and Italians buy my stuff all the time. Not as much as the US, UK, Germany, Canada or South Korea, but more than most countries in the world.

Americans always buy the most by far, but they also have the population of half of Europe.
« Last Edit: July 21, 2017, 04:50 by increasingdifficulty »


SpaceStockFootage

  • Space, Sci-Fi and Astronomy Related Stock Footage

« Reply #26 on: July 21, 2017, 06:03 »
+1
I don't think many people in Europe get a month off either. Maybe only teachers?

Even teachers don't *really* get a whole month off. They spend a lot of their free time correcting exams or tests, preparing lessons for the next school year, etc.

That's what they tell you. They're actually out getting wasted and living it up.

« Reply #27 on: July 21, 2017, 06:04 »
0
I don't think many people in Europe get a month off either. Maybe only teachers?

Even teachers don't *really* get a whole month off. They spend a lot of their free time correcting exams or tests, preparing lessons for the next school year, etc.

That's what they tell you. They're actually out getting wasted and living it up.
Though not buying stock :-\....do they buy any for teaching materials does anyone know?

ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #28 on: July 21, 2017, 08:35 »
0
I don't think many people in Europe get a month off either. Maybe only teachers?

Even teachers don't *really* get a whole month off. They spend a lot of their free time correcting exams or tests, preparing lessons for the next school year, etc.

That's what they tell you. They're actually out getting wasted and living it up.
Though not buying stock :-\....do they buy any for teaching materials does anyone know?


Possibly, but probably not in numbers.

I didn't and here's why:
1. I needed far too many images - 20-50 per lesson, so no matter how cheap it wasn't affordable, and I've have had to buy myself, because:
2. My authority didn't sanction buying things in advance. We had to get the goods then check them and pay for them, including electronic goods. Obviously companies which wanted to be in that market could cope with that, Micro couldn't.
3. We didn't have to pay VAT, and companies in the market took care of that for us, Micro couldn't.

I did buy one micro file, once, to put into a Powerpoint.
Then I realised that the CLA (at the time, it seems to have changed now) said that I couldn't give it to someone else in a form they could extract the image from, and I had it in a Powerpoint (now it says  "The seat/user restrictions refer to the raw file of content, not the end project or use." (But the picture could be extracted from the PP, so that's moot.)

If you licensed the content with credits, this means that you may share content within your organization but the content may only be available to one person at any one time. Unless you purchase an extended license, you may not store the content on a server (giving more than one person simultaneous access to the content).".
(Still, anyone can screendump from just about any source). So it wasn't much use if I couldn't make up a powerpoint and share it with my department, and teachers are, by necessity, extremely adept at repurposing resources. Then the authority decided that everything on our local department files on our school network had to go onto the authority network so that all resources could be shared across the authority, which was an excellent idea, but it was throwing up the possibility of ELs being necessary, so I removed the file from the powerpoint.

In addition, at that time (I've been out of the game for nearly seven  years now  8)), most micros either had no editorial or had just started, and the shiny, happy all-American people popular on micros then totally failed the pupils' innate BS test. There were almost no actual, real-looking useful imagery at the time, and micro was full of shiny happy people with perfect teeth and skin, and I needed to illustrate real 'issues', personal, social and global.

Other teachers in other situations may well pay for stock, I'm only stating why I didn't (except for once). A few months before I left, they went onto a system where tens of thousands of images were available in a closed system to teachers and pupils. I don't know where they came from, but we were told they were good for educational use* They weren't studio shots or set ups (so far more useful), and of the few I picked out to use, I tried and didn't find any of them on agencies.
*but in fact within a public school system, 'fair use' normally applies legally to any images.

namussi

« Reply #29 on: July 21, 2017, 08:39 »
+2


Even teachers don't *really* get a whole month off. They spend a lot of their free time correcting exams or tests, preparing lessons for the next school year, etc.

So that explains why they don't buy many stock pictures.

« Reply #30 on: July 21, 2017, 10:04 »
+3
Call me crazy, but I would say that 99.99% of pictures used by teachers in a classroom setting (PowerPoint or similar) are not bought... They are the first hits on Google image search.

ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #31 on: July 21, 2017, 10:08 »
0
Call me crazy, but I would say that 99.99% of pictures used by teachers in a classroom setting (PowerPoint or similar) are not bought... They are the first hits on Google image search.
Once Glow started, we were told to always look there first for images. I believe they have the system in England & Wales too, or something very similar.

angelawaye

  • Eat, Sleep, Keyword. Repeat

« Reply #32 on: July 21, 2017, 10:33 »
+3
Call me crazy, but I would say that 99.99% of pictures used by teachers in a classroom setting (PowerPoint or similar) are not bought... They are the first hits on Google image search.

My son brought home an animal assignment and my photo was on it. I told the teacher how cool it was to see my photo on his homework sheet and she said she found it on google.

There you go ...

« Reply #33 on: July 21, 2017, 11:11 »
0
Call me crazy, but I would say that 99.99% of pictures used by teachers in a classroom setting (PowerPoint or similar) are not bought... They are the first hits on Google image search.

My son brought home an animal assignment and my photo was on it. I told the teacher how cool it was to see my photo on his homework sheet and she said she found it on google.

There you go ...

Exactly.  ;D

« Reply #34 on: July 23, 2017, 08:50 »
0
I can't help thinking this site is turning into some kind of gloom cult when we are half way through July and people are moaning about August sales....

Turning into?  ::)   :)

Brasilnut

  • Author Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock & Blog

« Reply #35 on: July 23, 2017, 13:48 »
0
Quote
I told the teacher how cool it was to see my photo on his homework sheet and she said she found it on google. 

Take down notice time + invoice!  ;D

ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #36 on: July 23, 2017, 14:07 »
0
Quote
I told the teacher how cool it was to see my photo on his homework sheet and she said she found it on google. 

Take down notice time + invoice!  ;D

Smiley noted, but in case anyone missed it, that use could be covered by Fair Use, depending on the country of use.
For UK: https://www.copyrightservice.co.uk/copyright/p09_fair_use
For US, it's more complex: https://www.copyright.gov/fair-use/more-info.html
 "other countries are available"

« Reply #37 on: July 23, 2017, 14:25 »
0
Call me crazy, but I would say that 99.99% of pictures used by teachers in a classroom setting (PowerPoint or similar) are not bought... They are the first hits on Google image search.

Even more, this is very true inside well known national companies. Granted, at the corporate level, microstock subscriptions are available, mainly for the marketing department. But regular folks don't really have access to them, and even if they did, often there is no corporate communication around copyright laws and nobody bothers to enforce them.
This results in engineers, building fancy powerpoint decks, widely shared inside the company, full of assumed free photos and illustrations copied from the internet (sometimes even watermarked).

And nobody cares.
« Last Edit: July 23, 2017, 14:33 by Zero Talent »

ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #38 on: July 23, 2017, 17:01 »
0
I just happened onto a TEDx talk. The speaker was speaking and at one point, a slide came up behind her with a 123RF watermark. I guess someone may have forgotten to replace it with a purchased pic.


 

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