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Author Topic: video/photo rules in public spaces  (Read 1996 times)

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weathernewsonline

« on: December 04, 2015, 18:46 »
0
Welcome to Toronto....this is why I think my older stock video is gonna sell in the long run, stuff I could get away with just five years ago would get me arrested today for filming in public spaces, I got a good taste of this particular law while filming the cherry blossoms this year in High Park, was not charged but almost.  Good thing I over shot the honk out of the event, can't even film a squirrel in public park anymore.   I suspect a lot of my on-campus stuff will soon be of more value, won't be long before that will be a no-no even if filming from a public sidewalk.   

Oddly enough I filmed the heck out of the downtown financial district unchallenged by police not too long ago but that was on the day of the stock market correction and other media were doing same.

The city argues "privacy", I'm quite sure most politicians are not aware of the existence of social media, a platform where the public lives their lives as an open book and posts way too much information and photos to be honest.....privacy? in a public place?     Oh...and try and film the beach on a hot summer day.....that used to be a standard weather shot on a hot summer day, well....the beach is also a park and today it would a problem to even try it.

When I did the crime beat and worked in hard news we would use all sorts of tactics and long lenses and to anything to not get spotted by the police,  my training in that was worth it because I use the same tactics to film......the weather today.

The rink in this Star story is a beautiful one and I actually got away with filming there once, one Christmas day, the only day of the year there was no security but last year it was fully staffed with security.  At Toronto City hall I have had better luck on a crowded evening, less chance of being noticed.

http://www.thestar.com/news/city-hall-blog/2015/12/city-of-toronto-says-you-need-permission-to-photograph-your-own-kids-in-a-park-or-outdoor-rink.html



« Reply #1 on: December 04, 2015, 20:22 »
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I understand the aggravation of being hassled by donut cops - I've had that experience. And I'm a big civil liberties guy.  But I have to agree with the city in this case - there's a 'right' to be left alone, that's coming under heavy pressure.  The old laws don't work anymore and we have to push back against hidden cameras, GoPros on everyone, video obsessed geeks, @ssholes like Arne Svenson, and a thousand idiot geeks with camera equipped drones.  I'm a photographer too but I'd also like to be able to sit in a park without showing up on YouTube as "weird old guy in the park today". 



« Last Edit: December 04, 2015, 22:28 by stockastic »

« Reply #2 on: December 04, 2015, 22:38 »
+1
There's a difference between showing up as "random person 45" in the background of a picture or video of a family member and being the subject of a stalker.  The law in that article goes waaaaay overboard, IMO.

« Reply #3 on: December 05, 2015, 12:07 »
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This particular law is over the top.  But so is photography in public.  We have to work out a new set of rules that makes sense for everyone, not just stock photographers.

I don't want camera drones buzzing over my head.  I don't want Facebook's facial recognition software tagging me in photos taken by people I don't know.  I don't want some talentless 'artist' shooting candid photos of me through my windows at home.  I don't want to go into a museum or conservatory, or stand at a scenic overlook, and have to step carefully around a dozen tripods. I don't like being unable to see a historic site because of endless family and tour groups lining up for photos.

In this case the driving force was parents' crazy fears of their kids being photographed by strangers.  I'm not a parent myself so I can't really grasp why this is so terrifying, but of course the news media give us on-line pedophiles every day and people apparently think that having a child's picture 'on the internet' makes him a target - except of course for the 50 pictures of that kid they post on FB themselves every week.

« Last Edit: December 05, 2015, 12:51 by stockastic »


 

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