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Author Topic: Working with models - please help  (Read 2953 times)

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« on: January 10, 2014, 06:51 »
0
Hi,
I am in microstock from 2012 producing illustrations 95%, photos 5%. Now I want to develop my photograpy portofolio and i want to work with models. I did the research, prepare every detail, I did tests, etc. I am ready for my first photo shoot(that will produce microstock photos) with a model. Still, I have a few questions that remains unanswered. If you have experience and you are not IS exclusive, please help me:

1. How much do you spend on average on a photo shoot? Model, make-up, etc - total only.

2. How many photos do you produce on average in a photo shoot? I'm interested on how many pictures do you get accepted.

3. How much time passes by until you recover your investment? Days, weeks, months...

I know it depends on how many hours you book the model, but i just want to make an idea and to have some figures to compare with.
More hours, more money spent, more photos, I know. I just want to make some calculations.

Thank you and please excuse my english .


Ed

« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2014, 08:55 »
+2
The going rate for models and the going rate for a makeup artist (if necessary) depends on where you live.

I have some shoots where I spent over $1,200 on studio, makeup, models etc.  I have yet to license a single image from that shoot - and it was back in the summer of 2012.

In some instances you do a TFCD shoot - trade the model for her time by providing him/her with images for their portfolio.  Model is free in that instance...you can also ask the model to do their own makeup.  Studio space/outdoor space with permits is out of your pocket.  This is the least expensive way to get by.

The amount of images you get - depends on the shoot, depends on how good YOU are at posing the model, depends on how many wardrobe changes you negotiate with the model, depends on how long the shoot is.

How much time until you recover your investment - depends on the topic of the shoot, depends on your photography skills, depends on which agents you use.

« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2014, 09:05 »
0
In some instances you do a TFCD shoot - trade the model for her time by providing him/her with images for their portfolio.  Model is free in that instance...you can also ask the model to do their own makeup.  Studio space/outdoor space with permits is out of your pocket.  This is the least expensive way to get by.
Agreed. In fact 99% of my port consists of models and I've never paid them a dime. Every "model-wanna-be" needs a port. Every actor/actress/media person needs a port. Every makeup/hair stylist needs a port, etc.

Make some business cards and place them at schools/businesses where these types of people hang/work/or go to school.

If you shoot outdoors, there's no studio fees/costs. Just make sure you get signed releases and a simple contract detailing the terms of the "exchange" - that you have the right to sell the images.

good luck!
« Last Edit: January 10, 2014, 09:07 by anonymous »

« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2014, 03:27 »
0
In my country, if you pay for model, make-up, location, it will cost around 200-250$ minimum. I wanted to know if it's worth it.

« Reply #4 on: January 13, 2014, 05:02 »
0
In some instances you do a TFCD shoot - trade the model for her time by providing him/her with images for their portfolio.  Model is free in that instance...you can also ask the model to do their own makeup.  Studio space/outdoor space with permits is out of your pocket.  This is the least expensive way to get by.
Agreed. In fact 99% of my port consists of models and I've never paid them a dime. Every "model-wanna-be" needs a port. Every actor/actress/media person needs a port. Every makeup/hair stylist needs a port, etc.

Make some business cards and place them at schools/businesses where these types of people hang/work/or go to school.

If you shoot outdoors, there's no studio fees/costs. Just make sure you get signed releases and a simple contract detailing the terms of the "exchange" - that you have the right to sell the images.

good luck!

+1

You will be surprised how many beautiful girls want professional pictures for free.

« Reply #5 on: January 13, 2014, 05:52 »
+1
In my country, if you pay for model, make-up, location, it will cost around 200-250$ minimum. I wanted to know if it's worth it.

Don't know.  Are you able to create images with people that will eventually bring in more than that?

« Reply #6 on: January 13, 2014, 07:25 »
0
To me it is like rising water.  For some photographers and some agencies the coming year will be too much to carry on.  Others will have to create images cheaper than years past.  I would think a photographer would have to spend money getting very good and quick at shooting models in scenes that will sell.  A new photographer is going to have to invest a chunk of money and time to get their skill at a very high level.    Might as well just hire someone to teach you or get ready for 200 dollar per hour trial and errror sessions !!!
« Last Edit: January 13, 2014, 07:40 by old crow »

ruxpriencdiam

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  • Location. Third stone from the sun
« Reply #7 on: January 13, 2014, 07:58 »
0
Use yourself and family members it's free!

ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #8 on: January 13, 2014, 09:23 »
0
In my country, if you pay for model, make-up, location, it will cost around 200-250$ minimum. I wanted to know if it's worth it.
Take a look at all the people photos which are already in the agencies and ask yourself if you can either
Produce similar work which is more saleable (the competition is huge for lifestyle, added to which you're competing with very well established shooters and image factories who will be way higher in the search)
or
Produce different work for which there is a market. An iStocker came onto my radar. Inter alia he shoots lifestyle pics of a particular ethnicity. Most of the other pics on iStock keyworded with that ethnicity don't look particularly typical, very generic; but his absolutely do. However, they hardly sell at all. Probably there isn't much of a market for that ethnicity on iStock, or maybe the  prices are too high for that locality.
Unfortunately, you can't do that sort of very useful research on most of the sites (which don't show download numbers), which is a pity as it can stop you wasting time/money.

Goofy

« Reply #9 on: January 13, 2014, 09:56 »
0
Not sure of your skill level but at my current skill level I will not be able to recover $250 thus I use family and friends for free.

« Reply #10 on: January 13, 2014, 12:14 »
+1
I am part of a studio cooperative in the US, where I pay $200/month. I always do trades with models, so I don't have any costs there. If I shoot for 2 hours, I plan to get 50-100 shots up to stock sites. Of course, it takes a bit of time to do the keywording and editing. As others have said, it's hard to predict which photos are going to sell. Some of it based on the skill of the photographer, some on the model, and some of it is just plain luck.

« Reply #11 on: January 14, 2014, 02:27 »
0
Thank you for your answers. It is true: it depends on what quality I produce, the model, number of pictures, etc. I guess I will try to find a free model and ask her to make-up herself and I will do a test session. I still have to pay to rent a studio which is 50 euros. I will see how it goes. I have some experience with illustrations sales and after a few weeks  I will be able to do some estimations and see if it is working for me.

Thank you again.

« Reply #12 on: January 14, 2014, 07:08 »
0
I still have to pay to rent a studio which is 50 euros.

They don't have the outside where you are?

« Reply #13 on: January 16, 2014, 02:22 »
0
:) It is winter now.

Ed

« Reply #14 on: January 16, 2014, 09:56 »
0
Winter lifestyle shoot outside -

Skiing
Snowboarding
Portraits with a fur coat
Sexy Portraits with bikini under fur coat
Ice Fishing
Snow Mobiling
Winter Driving
Car broken down in a snow bank
etc., etc., etc.

Back in 2006, I was ice fishing with a friend.  I took a few photos of her on the ice fishing.  She was wearing a standard jacket and snow pants.  The image licensed 3 times before I pulled it out of the micros - one of those licenses was on National Geographic website.  All of the topics related to ice recreation safety.  Unfortunately, I didn't grab a tear sheet for that image.

Here is another one - another friend that was with us that day...image was licensed via Dreamstime (upper right hand corner)

http://edendicott.photoshelter.com/#!/portfolio/G00008W0OIjiGtWY/16


You don't need a studio.
« Last Edit: January 16, 2014, 09:59 by Ed »


 

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