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Author Topic: what about going illustration ???  (Read 9667 times)

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« on: April 13, 2008, 05:46 »
0
good day to all ,,,

is it easier or worth a try to start illustrations with Ai ????
or the microstock agencies will be strict as accepting images ?

thanx in advance...

karim


« Reply #1 on: April 13, 2008, 05:50 »
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I have done a  number of illustrations.  Some sites take them... fotolia doesn't like mine, but i have a feeling it is more my 'style' that they don't like than illustrations in general.  Shutterstock, dreamstime, etc take them and they sell allright.

« Reply #2 on: April 13, 2008, 06:53 »
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thanx leaf...

but wht illustrations sell best..and do i have to take a caurse in Ai to work proffesiosnal

karim

bittersweet

« Reply #3 on: April 13, 2008, 08:33 »
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thanx leaf...

but wht illustrations sell best..and do i have to take a caurse in Ai to work proffesiosnal

karim

What some people don't realize is that it is very helpful to actually have a bit of natural talent for drawing. Simply purchasing the software does not make one a vector artist.

If you already know how to draw, you're leagues beyond many of the flood of bandwagon "illustrators" that are cropping up. If you don't yet know how to draw, I would highly recommend developing that skill before sinking hundreds of dollars into a software program. Check out the book The Creative License by Danny Gregory.

Also check out some of the free or shareware software programs such as Xara or Inkscape. They are not as full-featured as AI, but you will be able to get comfortable with using similar tools and you'll know how much you want to pursue the idea. :)

It can be very profitable, but it's not as easy as some would like. ;)

« Reply #4 on: April 13, 2008, 08:34 »
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A word of caution about illustrations before you go head long into attempting this aspect of stock.

You need to know right from the start, that this form of imaging is quite different than actual photography.
On the other hand it can be rewarding, and very productive financially if, and this is a BIG "IF", you are good.
I mean really good.

You need a total command of your vector software, ie. Adobe Illustrator. You should know also that it will be required that
you are a talented artist, with knowledge of balance, color, and composition. Each vector image requires planning and thought.
A process you should be familiar with as a photographer already.

It will require a lot of time and effort to learn the software. It it not easy either. The software is very expensive to boot!
You will be required to submit an EPS image along with a jpg of your illustration. Usually an EPS image compatable with illustrator ver 8

There is fierce competition in this field of stock. Those that are very good are at the top, those that are anything but good sink to the bottom.
There are no shades of gray in between good and bad. You are either good, or a bad illustrator. There is no room for mediocre illustrators.

IT's a fun skill to learn. Very rewarding, and I wish you luck
The MIZ 

« Reply #5 on: April 13, 2008, 09:11 »
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I use inkscape, it is free software.  It is quite easy to use.  The only reason I don't do more illustrations is that I don't like looking at my screen all day.    I find it more enjoyable taking photos and it is easier on my eyes.

« Reply #6 on: April 13, 2008, 10:00 »
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If you are talking about submitting vectors, they will also have to be technically perfect - no stray points, no open paths, And no transparency effects or other effects that don't translate to an EPS version 8 format. Many starting out who think vectors will be easier will do a fancy thng with all sorts of drop shadows and other fancy stuff only to find it rejected for incompatibility reasons. So it is worth your while to understand the technical requirements before diving in.

For vectors, I suggest you go through the "application process" for vectors at iStock to get an understanding of what is required. It's like a giant tutorial explaining tech requirements etc. You can always just go through it without submitting anything. Just abandon the application when you are done reading the stuff.

Bitmap illustrations, on the other hand have no such constraints with regards to effects because it is a flat raster file. I usually submit mine 6000 pix on the long side. Whether they will be accepted or not (or be saleable) depends on the subject matter. My illustrations do well.


vonkara

« Reply #7 on: April 13, 2008, 10:54 »
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I'm a pro in drawing and I graduated from the "school is boring Academy". I downloaded the CS3 trial version of ai, but I think to have the time to study this software in a while only and then it must take 1 or 2 years to become great.

At the same time , the vector that I see doesn't have much shadows and seem to be very simple drawing most of the time (because of the complexity of using the software). It's a total different form of art than drawing as I see.
« Last Edit: April 13, 2008, 10:59 by Vonkara »

bittersweet

« Reply #8 on: April 13, 2008, 11:20 »
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At the same time , the vector that I see doesn't have much shadows and seem to be very simple drawing most of the time (because of the complexity of using the software). It's a total different form of art than drawing as I see.


You need to look around a bit more then, because you are missing some extraordinary work. However, if you are only looking at icon sets and swirly backgrounds that comprise the entire vector collections on some sites, I can see why you might believe that.

Here are a few lightboxes to get you started. If you think that vector illustration has nothing to do with artistic talent, some of the work in there might surprise you:
http://www.istockphoto.com/file_search.php?action=file&lightboxID=736477
http://www.istockphoto.com/file_search.php?action=file&lightboxID=1451911
http://www.istockphoto.com/file_search.php?action=file&lightboxID=28645


(edited to fix link... sorry.)
« Last Edit: April 13, 2008, 11:26 by bittersweet »

« Reply #9 on: April 13, 2008, 11:33 »
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My illustrations are very simple, yet they sell reasonably well (I even got some ELs with them). I upload the raster file only. I applied vectors to IS once and got rejected, then never tried it again.

This is what I have in DT. 

Regards,
Adelaide
« Last Edit: April 13, 2008, 11:37 by madelaide »

bittersweet

« Reply #10 on: April 13, 2008, 11:40 »
0
Yes, some of the best selling illustrations ARE very simple. I wasn't trying to make any kind of sweeping generalizations suggesting otherwise. I was solely responding to the portion of this thread which was quoted in my post. Nothing more, nothing less.

cheers.

vonkara

« Reply #11 on: April 13, 2008, 11:44 »
0
At the same time , the vector that I see doesn't have much shadows and seem to be very simple drawing most of the time (because of the complexity of using the software). It's a total different form of art than drawing as I see.

If you think that vector illustration has nothing to do with artistic talent

Maybe I was blurry, but you can read in my post "It's a total different form of art...". And I will add a more difficult art than drawing. So I don't and will never say that it's has nothing to do whit art in general. Sorry I must be more clear next time
« Last Edit: April 13, 2008, 11:46 by Vonkara »

« Reply #12 on: April 13, 2008, 14:03 »
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u really rocks ... with all of ur opinions .. thanx.. i am going to have a course to improve my knowledge better

** u really have a good illustrations Adelaide ... they r not simple as u said wish i ll be half ur technique

karim

helix7

« Reply #13 on: April 13, 2008, 14:44 »
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What some people don't realize is that it is very helpful to actually have a bit of natural talent for drawing. Simply purchasing the software does not make one a vector artist...

Exactly.

I don't submit photos because although I own a DSLR and am trying to learn photography, I'm quite a long distance away from being able to submit stock-worthy photos. It amazes me that photo contributors who should be fully aware of how difficult it can be to take a good stock photo will come into the forums and talk about getting Illustrator so they can submit vectors, as if just owning the equipment is all it takes. If I tried going into a forum and saying, "Hey, I just bought a DSLR, so I'm a professional stock photographer now!", I'd be flamed beyond recognition.

Mekarim, you're on the right path by taking a class. It isn't always required, but if you're completely new with vector imaging, a class will help you get started more quickly.

I would also recommend lynda.com video courses. I've used a few and they are quite helpful. Not the same as the direct interaction you'd get from a real in-person course, but still good.



bittersweet

« Reply #14 on: April 13, 2008, 15:20 »
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I would also recommend lynda.com video courses. I've used a few and they are quite helpful. Not the same as the direct interaction you'd get from a real in-person course, but still good.

Yes! I second this bit of advice as well! I had to learn InDesign in a very trial-by-fire rushed situation and those training sessions on lynda.com really saved me!

« Reply #15 on: April 13, 2008, 19:00 »
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How much talent you need to have depends a bit on what you have in mind to submit, and where, as the sites have very different requirements. If you want to submit to istock, you really need to be able to draw a bit - I can draw a bit, but really don't go much further than using a brush and tablet with the occasional foray into the pen tool in Illustrator and I got through the istock acceptance process first time. On the other hand because I don't produce those glossy buttons and swirly backkgrounds my files get a lot of nice ratings from other illustrators, but don't sell very much!

Looking around at other sites, some allow you to submit jpegs of illustrations (which gets around the pretty complex requirements for getting files to meet the appropriate EPS criteria) and also take simpler files. It is possible, especially if you are a good photographer and thus have raw material to use as a source for traces, to produce some interesting things just by learning to use the pen tool. And if you are doing isolations in photoshop already, then the pen tool is probably familiar anyway. While traces aren't as easy to do as one might expect (I find them much more time consuming than original drawings and you need to have a good eye for light and shade to simplify things well enough to make an effective final product) - you can use them as the basis for finding a style and training your eye.

Illustrator is a complex and somewhat counter intuitive program to learn - but if you have a couple of weeks to immerse yourself into it and do nothing else it's possible to go a long way very quickly, as to produce stuff that's acceptable for microstock, only the basic illustrator functions are needed anyway. My eleven year old daughter spent a couple of weeks over the Christmas holidays doing nothing else, after watching me, and ended up decorating all her school books with home produced smilies and glossy icons, made several birthday cards and drew some manga figures...(but then she has been using photoshop since she was eight)


She wouldn't pass the istock inspection as her drawing isn't strong enough yet, although it's getting better, and she hasn't the patience to produce EPS8 compatible files. But I bet she'd have a chance at one of the sites which take jpegs of illustrations. Anyone know whether Shutterstock allow under eighteens to contribute? (istock do if a parent signs the contract)
« Last Edit: April 13, 2008, 19:03 by Susan S. »

« Reply #16 on: April 14, 2008, 06:49 »
0
A word of caution about illustrations before you go head long into attempting this aspect of stock.

You need to know right from the start, that this form of imaging is quite different than actual photography.
On the other hand it can be rewarding, and very productive financially if, and this is a BIG "IF", you are good.
I mean really good.


what about mixed media, not vector but
photo with photoshop design,etc..

in the category, it 's either PHOTO or ILLUSTRATION

what are our chances if you submit something like that?
will they reject?

bittersweet

« Reply #17 on: April 14, 2008, 07:34 »
0
A word of caution about illustrations before you go head long into attempting this aspect of stock.

You need to know right from the start, that this form of imaging is quite different than actual photography.
On the other hand it can be rewarding, and very productive financially if, and this is a BIG "IF", you are good.
I mean really good.


what about mixed media, not vector but
photo with photoshop design,etc..

in the category, it 's either PHOTO or ILLUSTRATION

what are our chances if you submit something like that?
will they reject?


Raster illustrations are acceptable if they are good, original pieces of art, (i.e. scans of fine art drawings/paintings or well-done 3D renderings). At istock, these are uploaded through the photo queue, so you'll need to be approved as a photographer but not as an illustrator unless you are uploading vectors.

It is very likely that something that looks like a completed "design" rather than stock will be rejected at istock. I have heard that it is hard to get composites through unless they are really well done. I'm not sure about the level of difficulty with other sites.

As with nearly everything, it greatly depends on your level of skill.

« Reply #18 on: April 14, 2008, 07:38 »
0
They will not reject mixed media: my all time best earner is a very simple mix of a photo and some photoshop elements.

Concerning vectors, I have myself tried to submit some of them recently and I even succeed in becoming a IS contributor (after three attempts)  ;D

My goal is not to become a master in vector art (because I'm afraid  don't have the artistic skills), but to be skilled enough to produce simple vectors suitable for stock.

The idea is to know enough all the main techniques which can be used to produce stock images (photo, bitmap illustrations, 3D and vector) as it is important IMHO to have a portfolio as diversified as possible.

But as many explain you, vector illustration is definitively not an easy technique especially because you have to upload EPS 8 compatible files (no transparency, drop shadow, no open path, no strokes etc.)




« Last Edit: April 14, 2008, 07:45 by araminta »

Microbius

« Reply #19 on: May 29, 2008, 09:35 »
0
I agree with most of the stuff said in this thread. Good simple concepts sell the best, but some better more artistic stuff will get you portfolio noticed.
I'm largely talking about the sites other than SS here especially IStock.
SS is the exception in that they will accept any old crap and, remarkably, it'll sell too!!!

« Reply #20 on: June 21, 2008, 18:04 »
0
I agree...

simple smart concepts are the biggest sellers...you will sell a lot more...

If you want to make more money that's the way to go...

that's my experience...


I agree with most of the stuff said in this thread. Good simple concepts sell the best, but some better more artistic stuff will get you portfolio noticed.
I'm largely talking about the sites other than SS here especially IStock.
SS is the exception in that they will accept any old crap and, remarkably, it'll sell too!!!


 

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