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Author Topic: Adobe Announces the new Photoshop will be subscription only  (Read 21411 times)

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« Reply #125 on: May 10, 2013, 06:53 »
0
If there was a real functioning market, the answer to all of this would be a cheaper alternative on linux or andriod (no, gimp isn't an alternative) maybe even micro payment stuff like many other apps, to squeeze . out of adobe. They deserve it, ppl only think photoshop is great because there's nothing around to compete with it, if you take a step back it's actually a pretty poorly written software... getting slower and slower while processing power keeps doubling, and hey, no preview in cs6? what?? what a joke...


« Reply #126 on: May 10, 2013, 07:08 »
0
Adobe has announced they are CONSIDERING a photography only type subscription

There already is: $19 USD

« Reply #127 on: May 10, 2013, 07:13 »
0
Personally, I couldn't do business without using 4 or 5 of the core Adobe apps every day so for me this makes a lot of sense.  I subscribed 7 months ago and I'm absolutely loving it.  New features and fixes added to Illustrator in real time? Yes please! I also really enjoy getting to use the new products under development particularly the new web/mobile development tools.  I think if you are using a technology professionally it really pays to be keeping up with current tools and best practices.

At first I was very wary of the idea of "renting" software, but my experience so far has changed my mind.  This model definitely has an audience that it makes sense for, but I do think they should be offering some more flexible option for people who don't want the latest and greatest or an ongoing cost.
I wouldnt mind renting either, but the price is too steep for me. If I checked correctly, CS6 alone will cost me 37 euro a month. Too dear.  If it would cost me 20 euros or dollars a month, I wouldnt have a single doubt and subscribe.

I think you are just afraid of change and are intimidated by having to learn the new technology. ;D
« Last Edit: May 10, 2013, 07:27 by Mantis »

« Reply #128 on: May 10, 2013, 07:23 »
+1
If there was a real functioning market, the answer to all of this would be a cheaper alternative on linux or andriod (no, gimp isn't an alternative) maybe even micro payment stuff like many other apps, to squeeze . out of adobe. They deserve it, ppl only think photoshop is great because there's nothing around to compete with it, if you take a step back it's actually a pretty poorly written software... getting slower and slower while processing power keeps doubling, and hey, no preview in cs6? what?? what a joke...


the whole computer graphics market is monopolized by the usual 4-5 major software houses, they started 30 yrs ago and they invested billions in R&D and now each one of their products uses dozens of their patents.

these CGI algorithms are very very complex, you need expensive software engineers specialized in CGI just to make a moderately complex PS plugin, it's going to be impossible and not business worthy to even dream about a "PS clone" especially because of Adobe's patents.

cr-ap like GIMP and Corel Photopaint have been around for more than 10 yrs and they've their niche market but that's their place and that's where they're going to stay.

only a clone of LR is possible as it's basically a stripped down version of PS with integrated library and Raw stuff, i've seen a few LR alternative in action and they're not too bad :

- Darktable
- Raw Therapee
- Corel AfterShot Pro


PhotoDirector also looks like a better product than Acdsee Pro for generic photo management and poorman's DAM, i'm going to try it out now.

http://www.cyberlink.com/products/photodirector-ultra/features_en_US.html

aspp

« Reply #129 on: May 10, 2013, 08:23 »
0
cr-ap like GIMP and Corel Photopaint have been around for more than 10 yrs and they've their niche market but that's their place and that's where they're going to stay.

only a clone of LR is possible as it's basically a stripped down version of PS with integrated library and Raw stuff, i've seen a few LR alternative in action and they're not too bad :

- Darktable
- Raw Therapee
- Corel AfterShot Pro

Most people I know now use Lightoom for most of what they do - mostly as a better version of ACR plus the library functions. Many people I know have also been using Lightoom in conjunction with third party external tools such as those from Nik - though I see the use of Nik and other externals declining as arguably better third party Lightroom integrated presets have been launched (e.g. from VSCO which come complete with their own alternative curves and camera profiles). I could probably fairly easily switch to Aperture (or perhaps even Darktable at some point later) if Adobe made Lightroom less attractive.

So with Lightoom as the base, what do you actually need from Photoshop or a Photoshop clone ? For me it's curves, layers, masking with variable brushes, levels and gaussian blur. Plus I need to be able to check the levels after a file is written to JPEG and that the colors are within gamut. Everything else I can do within Lightroom. Some of that I can already do within Lightroom but prefer to do in PS.

So CS3 is fine for me still. And if there comes a time when my copy will no longer run under some future OS version then I would definitely consider GIMP. Especially since GIMP is on the verge of fully supporting 16 bit color and now exists in fully native Mac, Linux and Windows versions. There is not so much I need it to do anyhow.

Down the road we will all be on tablets anyhow. The whole model is going to change and the cloud is going to be an important and useful part of that.
« Last Edit: May 10, 2013, 09:22 by aspp »

WarrenPrice

« Reply #130 on: May 10, 2013, 09:31 »
-1
cr-ap like GIMP and Corel Photopaint have been around for more than 10 yrs and they've their niche market but that's their place and that's where they're going to stay.

only a clone of LR is possible as it's basically a stripped down version of PS with integrated library and Raw stuff, i've seen a few LR alternative in action and they're not too bad :

- Darktable
- Raw Therapee
- Corel AfterShot Pro

Most people I know now use Lightoom for most of what they do - mostly as a better version of ACR plus the library functions. Many people I know have also been using Lightoom in conjunction with third party external tools such as those from Nik - though I see the use of Nik and other externals declining as arguably better third party Lightroom integrated presets have been launched (e.g. from VSCO which come complete with their own alternative curves and camera profiles). I could probably fairly easily switch to Aperture (or perhaps even Darktable at some point later) if Adobe made Lightroom less attractive.

So with Lightoom as the base, what do you actually need from Photoshop or a Photoshop clone ? For me it's curves, layers, masking with variable brushes, levels and gaussian blur. Plus I need to be able to check the levels after a file is written to JPEG and that the colors are within gamut. Everything else I can do within Lightroom. Some of that I can already do within Lightroom but prefer to do in PS.

So CS3 is fine for me still. And if there comes a time when my copy will no longer run under some future OS version then I would definitely consider GIMP. Especially since GIMP is on the verge of fully supporting 16 bit color and now exists in fully native Mac, Linux and Windows versions. There is not so much I need it to do anyhow.

Down the road we will all be on tablets anyhow. The whole model is going to change and the cloud is going to be an important and useful part of that.

Excellent Point.

« Reply #131 on: May 10, 2013, 09:52 »
0
"Down the road we will all be on tablets anyhow."

Does that mean that the reviewers will use tablets to review files? Yikes!


aspp

« Reply #133 on: May 10, 2013, 10:33 »
0
"Down the road we will all be on tablets anyhow."

Does that mean that the reviewers will use tablets to review files? Yikes!

Why yikes ? The iPads have excellent IPS retina panels in them and many of the best Android tablets are also IPS.

Personally I am looking forward to the day when I can do it all on a tablet. Currently the main issue is that they do not have enough local storage ( -- Lightroom type apps need local storage because it will be a long while before typical internet connections are going to be fast enough for it to be practical for photographers to quickly upload to the cloud, say, several days worth of pictures - especially when on the road).

ShadySue

« Reply #134 on: May 10, 2013, 10:38 »
0
A lot of places where I photograph have no cellphone/internet availability. Even two miles from home.

aspp

« Reply #135 on: May 10, 2013, 10:58 »
0
A lot of places where I photograph have no cellphone/internet availability. Even two miles from home.

Same for everyone.

ShadySue

« Reply #136 on: May 10, 2013, 11:14 »
0
A lot of places where I photograph have no cellphone/internet availability. Even two miles from home.

Same for everyone.
Really? I thought most microstockers shoot in studios in towns.  :o

Poncke v2

« Reply #137 on: May 10, 2013, 11:58 »
+2
I am not sure if image processing will ever be done on tablets.

« Reply #138 on: May 10, 2013, 12:40 »
+2
I am not sure if image processing will ever be done on tablets.


I sure cant imagine image processing on a tablet. I love my ipad, and the retina display is great, but the screen is just too small. And i would need to be able to connect a mouse or wacom. By the time you do all that, well, you might as well use a computer.

aspp

« Reply #139 on: May 10, 2013, 13:06 »
+2
I sure cant imagine image processing on a tablet. I love my ipad, and the retina display is great, but the screen is just too small. And i would need to be able to connect a mouse or wacom. By the time you do all that, well, you might as well use a computer.

Well you could always use a stylus. Also - most photographic stuff is broad brush - it tends to be about areas of the image - approximately rather than being pixel specific. That's certainly very much how Aperture, Lightroom and most of the Nik stuff is. And that's very like how it was back in the darkroom when we were using our hands - plus dodging and burning tools and bits of card etc.

(Also check out the Adobe Mighty stylus and Napoleon ruler which they were demonstrating this week).

« Reply #140 on: May 10, 2013, 13:25 »
+5
 "Also - most photographic stuff is broad brush - it tends to be about areas of the image - approximately rather than being pixel specific."

You must not have ever submitted an isolation to iStock.
« Last Edit: May 10, 2013, 13:30 by rimglow »

aspp

« Reply #141 on: May 10, 2013, 14:19 »
+2
You must not have ever submitted an isolation to iStock.

I tend to see that sort of thing as being more in the realm of designers, rather than photographers. Sure those sorts of people are going to be desk-bound long after most people have switched to tablets. I did write "most" - and most photographers are not doing isolations. Which is why tools like Lightroom are not pixel specific for the user - and in many ways increasingly mimic analog processes.

BTW - not that it matters, but why on earth would my previous comment get voted down ? I can understand a post getting voted down if it is nasty, ignorant or rude - but not if someone simply disagrees with an otherwise friendly opinion.

« Reply #142 on: May 10, 2013, 14:27 »
+3
BTW - not that it matters, but why on earth would my previous comment get voted down ? I can understand a post getting voted down if it is nasty, ignorant or rude - but not if someone simply disagrees with an otherwise friendly opinion.

Because they disagree?

Why does everyone care who votes what up or down?  I never even look at that.

« Reply #143 on: May 10, 2013, 14:28 »
0

BTW - not that it matters, but why on earth would my previous comment get voted down ? I can understand a post getting voted down if it is nasty, ignorant or rude - but not if someone simply disagrees with an otherwise friendly opinion.

Sorry, my mistake. I changed it.

WarrenPrice

« Reply #144 on: May 10, 2013, 15:50 »
0
cr-ap like GIMP and Corel Photopaint have been around for more than 10 yrs and they've their niche market but that's their place and that's where they're going to stay.

only a clone of LR is possible as it's basically a stripped down version of PS with integrated library and Raw stuff, i've seen a few LR alternative in action and they're not too bad :

- Darktable
- Raw Therapee
- Corel AfterShot Pro

Most people I know now use Lightoom for most of what they do - mostly as a better version of ACR plus the library functions. Many people I know have also been using Lightoom in conjunction with third party external tools such as those from Nik - though I see the use of Nik and other externals declining as arguably better third party Lightroom integrated presets have been launched (e.g. from VSCO which come complete with their own alternative curves and camera profiles). I could probably fairly easily switch to Aperture (or perhaps even Darktable at some point later) if Adobe made Lightroom less attractive.

So with Lightoom as the base, what do you actually need from Photoshop or a Photoshop clone ? For me it's curves, layers, masking with variable brushes, levels and gaussian blur. Plus I need to be able to check the levels after a file is written to JPEG and that the colors are within gamut. Everything else I can do within Lightroom. Some of that I can already do within Lightroom but prefer to do in PS.

So CS3 is fine for me still. And if there comes a time when my copy will no longer run under some future OS version then I would definitely consider GIMP. Especially since GIMP is on the verge of fully supporting 16 bit color and now exists in fully native Mac, Linux and Windows versions. There is not so much I need it to do anyhow.

Down the road we will all be on tablets anyhow. The whole model is going to change and the cloud is going to be an important and useful part of that.

Excellent Point.

I wrote two words and got a minus -1. 
Is this something personal?


« Reply #145 on: May 10, 2013, 18:06 »
0
(Also check out the Adobe Mighty stylus and Napoleon ruler which they were demonstrating this week).


Here's a video for those of you that haven't seen it... Very cool!

Adobe Mighty and Napoleon

lisafx

« Reply #146 on: May 10, 2013, 19:07 »
+7
Personally, I am not "afraid" of new technology at all.  But I also have learned the difference between what is necessary to do my job and make money, vs. the need to be on the cutting edge of everything all the time (bragging rights). 

When I was doing photography as a hobby, I always had to have the newest and greatest.  Once it became a job, purchases have to justify themselves financially. 

Bottom line for me is that the changes between Photoshop CS4 and CS6 are negligible.  I am interested to try the content aware fill as a cool gadget, but if you are shooting stock and doing a good job of it, you don't really need a whole lot of editing.  The basics of good lighting, composition, and concept are still what sells photos.  Buyers don't care what software you are editing in, nor really even what camera you use, as long as there is enough resolution for their purposes. 



gillian vann

  • *Gillian*
« Reply #148 on: May 10, 2013, 22:19 »
+3
Personally, I am not "afraid" of new technology at all.  But I also have learned the difference between what is necessary to do my job and make money, vs. the need to be on the cutting edge of everything all the time (bragging rights). 


Yes I don't appreciate being told I'm "afraid" of change. I'm not afraid of technology, but I use it to suit me, rather than have it dictate how and when I must change my systems. 

Poncke v2

« Reply #149 on: May 11, 2013, 01:54 »
-2
I think you are all taking my comment out of context, it was a reply to a certain comment, it had little to do with adobe's creative cloud. It was about holding on to old software because you dont like how the new software is working. Things change, the way we work change. Its like saying I dont want to use a digital camera and keep shooting film. If you do that you loose the edge over some who does embrace change.

And Gillian, I never told you, you were afraid of change, this is now the second time I have to explain that.

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