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Author Topic: New rules for editorials (again)  (Read 9511 times)

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« Reply #25 on: April 03, 2013, 07:44 »
+2
thanks for clarifying...
Scottbraut, can you please let us know if SS has the intention to improve On the Red Carpet service for the future? I have tried to deal with them in the past, but it seemed it is not 100% reliable...


« Reply #26 on: April 03, 2013, 22:53 »
+1
agreed. Great idea but the program kind of falls flat in how I've seen it work.

My biggest complaints are it seems like a big black hole once you put your info out. From there you either don't hear anything at all ever at all, or you get an approval. I think only once did I get a "ok we are in talks please be on the lookout", though that one turned into silence after that as well no denial, no approval just be on the lookout. Some kind of quick feedback would mean a lot even if it was just a hey sorry didn't work, sorry no reply, hey we are checking. At least at that point it stocks the black hole feel.
The other thing that adds to that is I've had talks with a few PR people got the info that's required and carried on a decent conversation with them with a few back and forth emails, send to on the red carpet and from there it just vanishes.

I admit I don't know what goes on form there once I pass it off. They could be working their little bums off trying to get things going. I really don't know but that is part of what frustrates me so much is I don't know. I never know what is going on or what happens from there. It's honestly made me tempted to ask if I could just have SS fill out the forms and send them to me and then I would deal with the PR myself as at least that way I would feel part of the loop.

Please don't get me wrong I love the idea, love the program in ways. It's just at points the program as trofia said though it doesn't seem 100% reliable.

I do hope you continue it though just would like to see some improvement on it.

« Reply #27 on: April 08, 2013, 09:00 »
0
I wish I had known about this before I sent in my first 10 images for review.  They are editorial, and have been in the queue for what seems like forever!

« Reply #28 on: April 09, 2013, 09:11 »
0
I wish I had known about this before I sent in my first 10 images for review.  They are editorial, and have been in the queue for what seems like forever!

Well, they were reviewed and all rejected unfortunately. 

Quote
Please follow EXACTLY the caption (title) guidelines for editorial (including CAPITAL LETTERS): please read link provided   First: LOCATION Second: DATE Third: Description with date and location at the end of title

Seems I had the location/date prefix in caps, but missed repeating the same information at the end of the title.  Seems a bit frustrating to have to wait so long, and now to have to re-submit again, just for something like this  :(

« Reply #29 on: September 03, 2013, 23:34 »
0
Hi guys,

To clarify...

As has been our policy, credentials are required for events taking place on private property or events which require a paid ticket or entry fee. In our assessment, these types of events commonly restrict attendees from shooting and licensing content taken of the event without the event holder's permission.

Based on our policy, a free festival or parade in a public area would not require credentials as the event is open to the public and does not take place on private property.

The reason we are now requesting event badges and/or correspondence with an authorized representative of the event is that these are the most common types of credentials we receive, and we believe them to be a trustworthy indicator of permission to shoot an event. Our goal is that by having contributors submit these specific credentials to us, the process of reviewing these images will go faster.

However, we also recognize that different events may provide credentials other than a badge or correspondence with an authorized representative. As we state in our policy, we will evaluate credentials on a case-by-case basis when you email us.

If you have any further questions regarding whether content you wish to submit requires credentials, please contact credentials@shutterstock.com for more information.

Thanks,

Scott
VP of Content
Shutterstock

Having issues with this now. I shot an event that was a bike race on a public road that I took images of from the sidewalk. After having a chat with one of the reps at shutterstock I'm being told that it's a no go. Even though the event is on public property and open to the public I still need permission from the event holder to be able to photograph and use those images being that I am using them for monetary gain. So far the only reason I have been given as to why is being it's a sporting event credentials are required. If it was a parade I'm told it's fine, if it was a festival I would be fine.

Is this normal and do we need to get permission to use images in an editorial license if they are shot on public?

ruxpriencdiam

    This user is banned.
  • Location. Third stone from the sun
« Reply #30 on: September 04, 2013, 06:14 »
0
Hi guys,

To clarify...

As has been our policy, credentials are required for events taking place on private property or events which require a paid ticket or entry fee. In our assessment, these types of events commonly restrict attendees from shooting and licensing content taken of the event without the event holder's permission.

Based on our policy, a free festival or parade in a public area would not require credentials as the event is open to the public and does not take place on private property.

The reason we are now requesting event badges and/or correspondence with an authorized representative of the event is that these are the most common types of credentials we receive, and we believe them to be a trustworthy indicator of permission to shoot an event. Our goal is that by having contributors submit these specific credentials to us, the process of reviewing these images will go faster.

However, we also recognize that different events may provide credentials other than a badge or correspondence with an authorized representative. As we state in our policy, we will evaluate credentials on a case-by-case basis when you email us.

If you have any further questions regarding whether content you wish to submit requires credentials, please contact credentials@shutterstock.com for more information.

Thanks,

Scott
VP of Content
Shutterstock

Having issues with this now. I shot an event that was a bike race on a public road that I took images of from the sidewalk. After having a chat with one of the reps at shutterstock I'm being told that it's a no go. Even though the event is on public property and open to the public I still need permission from the event holder to be able to photograph and use those images being that I am using them for monetary gain. So far the only reason I have been given as to why is being it's a sporting event credentials are required. If it was a parade I'm told it's fine, if it was a festival I would be fine.

Is this normal and do we need to get permission to use images in an editorial license if they are shot on public?
Would this fall under this?


Quote
Images submitted for editorial use that have been taken of the following require proof of credentials before they will accepted:
● Sporting events (including those taken at noncollegiate schools or recreational, nonprofessional events)
● Concerts
● Festivals
● Trade shows
● Theatrical performances (including those taken at school performances/theater)
● Conventions
● Openings
● Ticketed events

« Reply #31 on: September 04, 2013, 06:25 »
+2
Hi guys,

To clarify...

As has been our policy, credentials are required for events taking place on private property or events which require a paid ticket or entry fee. In our assessment, these types of events commonly restrict attendees from shooting and licensing content taken of the event without the event holder's permission.

Based on our policy, a free festival or parade in a public area would not require credentials as the event is open to the public and does not take place on private property.

The reason we are now requesting event badges and/or correspondence with an authorized representative of the event is that these are the most common types of credentials we receive, and we believe them to be a trustworthy indicator of permission to shoot an event. Our goal is that by having contributors submit these specific credentials to us, the process of reviewing these images will go faster.

However, we also recognize that different events may provide credentials other than a badge or correspondence with an authorized representative. As we state in our policy, we will evaluate credentials on a case-by-case basis when you email us.

If you have any further questions regarding whether content you wish to submit requires credentials, please contact credentials@shutterstock.com for more information.

Thanks,

Scott
VP of Content
Shutterstock

Having issues with this now. I shot an event that was a bike race on a public road that I took images of from the sidewalk. After having a chat with one of the reps at shutterstock I'm being told that it's a no go. Even though the event is on public property and open to the public I still need permission from the event holder to be able to photograph and use those images being that I am using them for monetary gain. So far the only reason I have been given as to why is being it's a sporting event credentials are required. If it was a parade I'm told it's fine, if it was a festival I would be fine.

Is this normal and do we need to get permission to use images in an editorial license if they are shot on public?

time for Alamy RM

« Reply #32 on: September 04, 2013, 10:17 »
0
Hi guys,

To clarify...

As has been our policy, credentials are required for events taking place on private property or events which require a paid ticket or entry fee. In our assessment, these types of events commonly restrict attendees from shooting and licensing content taken of the event without the event holder's permission.

Based on our policy, a free festival or parade in a public area would not require credentials as the event is open to the public and does not take place on private property.

The reason we are now requesting event badges and/or correspondence with an authorized representative of the event is that these are the most common types of credentials we receive, and we believe them to be a trustworthy indicator of permission to shoot an event. Our goal is that by having contributors submit these specific credentials to us, the process of reviewing these images will go faster.

However, we also recognize that different events may provide credentials other than a badge or correspondence with an authorized representative. As we state in our policy, we will evaluate credentials on a case-by-case basis when you email us.

If you have any further questions regarding whether content you wish to submit requires credentials, please contact credentials@shutterstock.com for more information.

Thanks,

Scott
VP of Content
Shutterstock

Having issues with this now. I shot an event that was a bike race on a public road that I took images of from the sidewalk. After having a chat with one of the reps at shutterstock I'm being told that it's a no go. Even though the event is on public property and open to the public I still need permission from the event holder to be able to photograph and use those images being that I am using them for monetary gain. So far the only reason I have been given as to why is being it's a sporting event credentials are required. If it was a parade I'm told it's fine, if it was a festival I would be fine.

Is this normal and do we need to get permission to use images in an editorial license if they are shot on public?
Would this fall under this?


Quote
Images submitted for editorial use that have been taken of the following require proof of credentials before they will accepted:
● Sporting events (including those taken at noncollegiate schools or recreational, nonprofessional events)
● Concerts
● Festivals
● Trade shows
● Theatrical performances (including those taken at school performances/theater)
● Conventions
● Openings
● Ticketed events

It is from one of those events though it was taken not on private property but a public area.
Sent from my SCH-I545 using Tapatalk 2


ruxpriencdiam

    This user is banned.
  • Location. Third stone from the sun
« Reply #33 on: September 04, 2013, 12:12 »
0
Hi guys,

To clarify...

As has been our policy, credentials are required for events taking place on private property or events which require a paid ticket or entry fee. In our assessment, these types of events commonly restrict attendees from shooting and licensing content taken of the event without the event holder's permission.

Based on our policy, a free festival or parade in a public area would not require credentials as the event is open to the public and does not take place on private property.

The reason we are now requesting event badges and/or correspondence with an authorized representative of the event is that these are the most common types of credentials we receive, and we believe them to be a trustworthy indicator of permission to shoot an event. Our goal is that by having contributors submit these specific credentials to us, the process of reviewing these images will go faster.

However, we also recognize that different events may provide credentials other than a badge or correspondence with an authorized representative. As we state in our policy, we will evaluate credentials on a case-by-case basis when you email us.

If you have any further questions regarding whether content you wish to submit requires credentials, please contact credentials@shutterstock.com for more information.

Thanks,

Scott
VP of Content
Shutterstock

Having issues with this now. I shot an event that was a bike race on a public road that I took images of from the sidewalk. After having a chat with one of the reps at shutterstock I'm being told that it's a no go. Even though the event is on public property and open to the public I still need permission from the event holder to be able to photograph and use those images being that I am using them for monetary gain. So far the only reason I have been given as to why is being it's a sporting event credentials are required. If it was a parade I'm told it's fine, if it was a festival I would be fine.

Is this normal and do we need to get permission to use images in an editorial license if they are shot on public?
Would this fall under this?


Quote
Images submitted for editorial use that have been taken of the following require proof of credentials before they will accepted:
● Sporting events (including those taken at noncollegiate schools or recreational, nonprofessional events)
● Concerts
● Festivals
● Trade shows
● Theatrical performances (including those taken at school performances/theater)
● Conventions
● Openings
● Ticketed events

It is from one of those events though it was taken not on private property but a public area.
Sent from my SCH-I545 using Tapatalk 2
But for these events private and or public makes no difference because it is a sporting event, this also applies to ticketed events where there is any fee being chargeed for access to the event.

« Reply #34 on: September 04, 2013, 13:02 »
0
What about what I quoted directly from Scott from Shutterstock? I'll put it here again so it's easier to find.
Quote
Based on our policy, a free festival or parade in a public area would not require credentials as the event is open to the public and does not take place on private property

A festival is listed in the events from the list you are quoting but Scott has said that if it is in a public area as it is open to the public it would not require credentials as it does not take place on private property.

Further quotes from other members of shutterstock have also said things along those same lines

http://submit.shutterstock.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=2517165#2517165
Quote
As has been our policy, credentials are required for content shot at events on private property, or events which require a paid ticket or entry fee.

Quote
First, based on our policy, a free or non-ticketed event in a public area would not require credentials. For example, content shot at public street fairs, festivals, parades, and recreational sporting activities taking place in public areas would generally not require credentials. Credentials are required specifically for content shot at events which take place on private property, or which require tickets or an entry fee. Content requiring credentials constitutes a small part of the editorial submissions we receive.

Here they bring up items as well that are on the restricted list that require credentials but seem to make a seperation between public vs private land.

It seems that being on public or private land does matter if I'm reading those correctly.
« Last Edit: September 04, 2013, 13:07 by txking »

ruxpriencdiam

    This user is banned.
  • Location. Third stone from the sun
« Reply #35 on: September 04, 2013, 13:12 »
-1
What about what I quoted directly from Scott from Shutterstock? I'll put it here again so it's easier to find.
Quote
Based on our policy, a free festival or parade in a public area would not require credentials as the event is open to the public and does not take place on private property

A festival is listed in the events from the list you are quoting but Scott has said that if it is in a public area as it is open to the public it would not require credentials as it does not take place on private property.

Further quotes from other members of shutterstock have also said things along those same lines

http://submit.shutterstock.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=2517165#2517165
Quote
As has been our policy, credentials are required for content shot at events on private property, or events which require a paid ticket or entry fee.

Quote
First, based on our policy, a free or non-ticketed event in a public area would not require credentials. For example, content shot at public street fairs, festivals, parades, and recreational sporting activities taking place in public areas would generally not require credentials. Credentials are required specifically for content shot at events which take place on private property, or which require tickets or an entry fee. Content requiring credentials constitutes a small part of the editorial submissions we receive.

Here they bring up items as well that are on the restricted list that require credentials but seem to make a seperation between public vs private land.

It seems that being on public or private land does matter if I'm reading those correctly.
None of that really matters because it was considered a sporting event because there was someone on a bicycle.

« Reply #36 on: September 04, 2013, 13:15 »
0
How does it not matter though that they specify events in a public setting do not require credentials?

If I took pictures of a festival would a credential be required?

« Reply #37 on: September 04, 2013, 13:36 »
0
How does it not matter though that they specify events in a public setting do not require credentials?

If I took pictures of a festival would a credential be required?

I can answer that one for you, it depends on the reviewer brunch quality ;D

(not kidding!)

Uncle Pete

« Reply #38 on: September 04, 2013, 14:19 »
+1
Images submitted for editorial use that have been taken of the following require proof of credentials before they will accepted:
● Sporting events (including those taken at noncollegiate schools or recreational, nonprofessional events)
● Concerts
● Festivals
● Trade shows
● Theatrical performances (including those taken at school performances/theater)
● Conventions
● Openings
● Ticketed events


Doesn't matter where you are standing, the above all require proof of credentials.

Does that explain it in a different way that makes more sense?

« Reply #39 on: September 04, 2013, 14:22 »
+1
Images submitted for editorial use that have been taken of the following require proof of credentials before they will accepted:
● Sporting events (including those taken at noncollegiate schools or recreational, nonprofessional events)
● Concerts
● Festivals
● Trade shows
● Theatrical performances (including those taken at school performances/theater)
● Conventions
● Openings
● Ticketed events

Doesn't matter where you are standing, the above all require proof of credentials.

Does that explain it in a different way that makes more sense?

Per shutterstock.
Quote
First, based on our policy, a free or non-ticketed event in a public area would not require credentials. For example, content shot at public street fairs, festivals, parades, and recreational sporting activities taking place in public areas would generally not require credentials. Credentials are required specifically for content shot at events which take place on private property, or which require tickets or an entry fee. Content requiring credentials constitutes a small part of the editorial submissions we receive.

No it doesn't make sense.

go through the post by shutterstock compliance, by scott, by anthony. All seem to saying much of the same things.
They created this list of events that require credentials because many times they are on private land or are private events where they as the event organizer are able to restrict the rights of people who enter.
The other things they have made a general saying of is events on public land that are public events do not require credentials. They as the above part I quoted have gone so far as to say even that events that are part of the list above do not require credentials as long as they are on public land and at public events.
They have said that the reason they ask for credentials is to make sure that if you are on private property or at a private event that you have permission to be there and photograph.
« Last Edit: September 04, 2013, 14:38 by txking »

« Reply #40 on: September 04, 2013, 14:28 »
0
Double post by mistake

« Reply #41 on: September 04, 2013, 14:34 »
0
you are right, something is wrong, oh agencies ;D tomorrow might be different, anyway how is your case regarding your "twin" brother?


« Reply #42 on: September 04, 2013, 14:39 »
+1
no word yet. case more or less has gone into limbo.
Only change I have really seen is my canadian "friend" has at least taken the information about how I am stealing his information off his public persona wall on facebook though he still has left that information on his private facebook wall.

Uncle Pete

« Reply #43 on: September 04, 2013, 14:43 »
0
Because the Sporting Events (and the rest of the restrictions) OVERRIDES the where you were standing guideline?

Simple logic will tell you, if one thing isn't allowed, the rest of the information is irrelevant.

The restrictions say, if you shoot these type of events, for commercial profit... you must have credentials. It doesn't matter what camera, what day, if you know a guy that knows the guy  ;) , where you are standing or if you are someones cousin. Once it's restricted to credentials only, all the other rules, guidelines, allowances and regulations don't exist.

Did that explain it?

And they use the word "generally not" where it should say, usually or normally would. It's confusing, I agree and it contradicts itself, but heck, it's microstock?



Images submitted for editorial use that have been taken of the following require proof of credentials before they will accepted:
● Sporting events (including those taken at noncollegiate schools or recreational, nonprofessional events)
● Concerts
● Festivals
● Trade shows
● Theatrical performances (including those taken at school performances/theater)
● Conventions
● Openings
● Ticketed events

Doesn't matter where you are standing, the above all require proof of credentials.

Does that explain it in a different way that makes more sense?

Per shutterstock.
Quote
First, based on our policy, a free or non-ticketed event in a public area would not require credentials. For example, content shot at public street fairs, festivals, parades, and recreational sporting activities taking place in public areas would generally not require credentials. Credentials are required specifically for content shot at events which take place on private property, or which require tickets or an entry fee. Content requiring credentials constitutes a small part of the editorial submissions we receive.


No it doesn't make sense.

This is direct from shutterstock compliance. What am I reading wrong on what they are saying?
« Last Edit: September 04, 2013, 14:46 by Uncle Pete »

« Reply #44 on: September 04, 2013, 15:00 »
0
Because the Sporting Events (and the rest of the restrictions) OVERRIDES the where you were standing guideline?

Simple logic will tell you, if one thing isn't allowed, the rest of the information is irrelevant.

The restrictions say, if you shoot these type of events, for commercial profit... you must have credentials. It doesn't matter what camera, what day, if you know a guy that knows the guy  ;) , where you are standing or if you are someones cousin. Once it's restricted to credentials only, all the other rules, guidelines, allowances and regulations don't exist.

Did that explain it?





Images submitted for editorial use that have been taken of the following require proof of credentials before they will accepted:
● Sporting events (including those taken at noncollegiate schools or recreational, nonprofessional events)
● Concerts
● Festivals
● Trade shows
● Theatrical performances (including those taken at school performances/theater)
● Conventions
● Openings
● Ticketed events

Doesn't matter where you are standing, the above all require proof of credentials.

Does that explain it in a different way that makes more sense?

Per shutterstock.
Quote
First, based on our policy, a free or non-ticketed event in a public area would not require credentials. For example, content shot at public street fairs, festivals, parades, and recreational sporting activities taking place in public areas would generally not require credentials. Credentials are required specifically for content shot at events which take place on private property, or which require tickets or an entry fee. Content requiring credentials constitutes a small part of the editorial submissions we receive.


No it doesn't make sense.

This is direct from shutterstock compliance. What am I reading wrong on what they are saying?


the part where you said "And they use the word "generally not" where it should say, usually or normally would. It's confusing, I agree and it contradicts itself, but heck, it's microstock?" I think makes about the most sense out of all of this.


« Reply #45 on: September 04, 2013, 16:37 »
+4

« Reply #46 on: September 04, 2013, 17:29 »
0
Thank you very much ScottBraut.

I can easily understand why some places and reasons have credentials. You don't want to restrict access to an event only to find out people are still just sneaking cameras in and doing shots anyway. Doesn't quite fit and being that it is a private event you by all means have rights to restrict it.

I do have one more question that I have follow up for regarding another event that I have. I can see both sides to the arguement on this and so I'm not sure which way it would go. If it doesn't get answered here I'll address it when shutterstock contacts me though.

Covered an event that takes place in a national forest on land that has a special use permit that they from what I guess lease. The location is open to the public though, So not sure how that would qualify under private/public as it is part of a national forest.
Anyway an event was held at that location which was open to the public, no tickets no special admission, no barricades, no entrance gate, no fees or anything like that to restrict access to the event if you are watching.
How would something like this work?

ruxpriencdiam

    This user is banned.
  • Location. Third stone from the sun
« Reply #47 on: September 04, 2013, 17:30 »
0
Hi all,

Our apologies for any misunderstanding. As we have stated, credentials are required for events taking place on private property and/or ticketed events.

Sporting events (or concerts, festivals, shows or performances) may not require credentials if they are public events taken on public property and do not require a ticket. However, content taken at such an event may require credentials if it appears that the content was taken from a restricted vantage point accessible only to the press or authorized individuals.

The issue with your images, TKing, appears to be that the team had questions about whether you took your images from an area that was restricted. Again, our apologies - our team is going to message you directly.

We'd like to stress that the reason for the credentials policy is to protect both our contributors and customers from potential legal issues that may arise from unauthorized images. That being said, we understand that some of the rules around credentials may be confusing. We're currently developing more educational materials so that we can help you understand our policies better.

In the meantime, as always, feel free to email us at submit@shutterstock.com if you have any questions.

Also - please note that I/we don't monitor these forums actively for support - please continue to use the email address as the primary channel for support questions and we will endeavor to help you the best that we can.

Best Regards,

Scott
VP of Content
Thanks for weighing in on this one Scott.

« Reply #48 on: September 04, 2013, 17:42 »
0
we talking about SS guys, not other agency, cheers Scott :D

« Reply #49 on: September 04, 2013, 23:34 »
+1
i still don't understand why SS is selling editorial, it has nothing to do with its core business model and i'm sure the sales are sluggish to say the least.

the requirements are also ridicolous, proofs of accreditation ? gimme a break, no other agency does that.

if i had some fresh news editorial to upload i would throw it at Demotix, they give you FTP and other upload tools and no BS asked.


 

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