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Author Topic: Press Credentials required by SS  (Read 3697 times)

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« on: November 01, 2017, 06:21 »
0
I submitted a few editorial photos from a traditional festival in Bhutan. Theses were rejected by Shutterstock with the motive: "Press Credentials -- This image was taken at an event requiring press credential".
I am surprise because others sites accepted my photos and previous photos of the same event I sent to Shutterstock 2 months ago were approved by Shutterstock. And, from my point of view there is no need to have a press card to take picture in this kind of festival.
Is it a new policy from Shutterstock or did I get my photos reviewed by a bad mood reviewer?
Did anyone experienced the same kind of reject and did you find any solution to get your photos accepted (other than giving a press credential)?


derek

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« Reply #1 on: November 01, 2017, 06:33 »
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Apart from stock I've done corporate assignment shooting for Black-Star for years and years and you do need press-credentials press passes and in events with lets say famous people pop-stars or whatever. If using the pics for a commercial or news where getting paid you firstly need a press-pass to get in and thats you press credentials. Sometimes they even insist on proof of being a professional photo journalist.

As far as SS? well I wouldnt trust their reviewers competent enough to judge something like that unless its a pic with Trump in the oval room. Best is to write to the as press association and ask etc.

« Reply #2 on: November 01, 2017, 06:35 »
+3
You have to fit in with whatever they say. It's their website.

« Reply #3 on: November 01, 2017, 07:17 »
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They have required press credentials as long as I can remember. If you want to submit these images to SS, you need to have a permission from the event organizer.

« Reply #4 on: November 01, 2017, 09:10 »
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Thank you for your replies.

I guess the Shutterstock reviewer that accepted my first set of photos on this event made a mistake.

« Reply #5 on: November 01, 2017, 09:47 »
+1
Thank you for your replies.

I guess the Shutterstock reviewer that accepted my first set of photos on this event made a mistake.
Try to resubmit it.
Reviewers are all over the place, in general the second time everything get accepted

« Reply #6 on: November 02, 2017, 01:41 »
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There is a problem with the press credential philosophy and requirement.

Ultimately, restrictions are made because they violate laws (copyright, trademark, patent, etc). Laws are made by legislative bodies, either through international treaty, federal regulations, or state regulations, and through city ordinances.

In this case, the agency is referring not to a legislative body but to a private entity which has no legislative ability. organizations that require press passes almost never have any legal right to enforce what you can or cannot do with your photography, as long as you take your photos in the public view. Attending an event that is open to the public, regardless of what type of pass you have, would be considered in the public view.

Rules made by private organizations almost never have any legal bearing, press pass requirements included.

Private entities with press pass requirements would almost never be able to restrict your rights in regards to photography at their events. They have no legal justification in the US. The First Ammendment prevents them from restricting your rights to cover their event.

Imagine if it applied to other media such as newspapers, they can't say that without a press pass, you can't write an article about the event. The same is true with photography.

In addition, Freedom of the  Press (which includes photography at press events) is protected by the First Ammendment of the US Constitution.

"The First Amendment (Amendment I) to the United States Constitution prevents Congress from making any law respecting an establishment of religion, prohibiting the free exercise of religion, or abridging the freedom of speech, the freedom of the press,"

If a private organization tried to prevent a stock agency from selling photos of an event due to lack of a press pass, the organization would lose and the stock agency would win as described above.

« Reply #7 on: November 02, 2017, 02:31 »
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In my case the event toke place in Asia (Bhutan) and I am European (France).

Even if Shutterstock is in the US, I am not sure the US constitution would apply.
I presume the festival organization could submit a complaint in Bhutan or France?

In fact, I dont know what law apply when parties from 3 different countries are involve in a photo complaint for copyright, right to privacy, etc.

« Reply #8 on: November 02, 2017, 07:22 »
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More information would be required: were the photos taken on private or public property, like monastery? Was the access open for all or not? Did you have to pay a fee? Was this a part of a photo tour, maybe arranged for tourists?

Was photography OK? By that I don't me law. I mean if it was respectful? Photographers always speak "it is my statutory right to photograph this blah blah" and it just gets other people defensive. You get better results if you treat people with respect.

Check out Shutterstock editorial guidelines if you already haven't
https://www.shutterstock.com/blog/submitting-editorial-content-part-2-documentary-editorial

If you believe you don't need credentials, you can always write to SS and state your case. They will issue you a submission code. It works much better than resubmitting.

namussi

« Reply #9 on: November 02, 2017, 09:04 »
+1

If a private organization tried to prevent a stock agency from selling photos of an event due to lack of a press pass, the organization would lose and the stock agency would win as described above.

You should read the small print on tickets. (And also do some research on non-US laws.)
« Last Edit: November 02, 2017, 09:08 by namussi »

« Reply #10 on: November 02, 2017, 16:31 »
+5
In my case the event toke place in Asia (Bhutan) and I am European (France).

Even if Shutterstock is in the US, I am not sure the US constitution would apply.
I presume the festival organization could submit a complaint in Bhutan or France?

In fact, I dont know what law apply when parties from 3 different countries are involve in a photo complaint for copyright, right to privacy, etc.

Don't get distracted by someones irrelevant rambling about laws, constitution and rights when they didn't answer your question. SS makes their own rules for what they take or not and the conditions for us to have them sell our work. Simple as that. May be law or may be the agency rule.

Write to SS credentials, include the situation, location and public access. If it's a ticketed event or paid access on private property, you probably won't be accepted. If it's public, no ticket, or something with open rights and access, you will get a case number and be able to submit for review.

[email protected]

namussi

« Reply #11 on: November 02, 2017, 18:38 »
0

Don't get distracted by someones irrelevant rambling about laws, constitution and rights when they didn't answer your question. SS makes their own rules for what they take or not and the conditions for us to have them sell our work. Simple as that. May be law or may be the agency rule.

Write to SS credentials, include the situation, location and public access. If it's a ticketed event or paid access on private property, you probably won't be accepted. If it's public, no ticket, or something with open rights and access, you will get a case number and be able to submit for review.

[email protected]

Best answer!

ShadySue

« Reply #12 on: November 02, 2017, 18:45 »
+1

If a private organization tried to prevent a stock agency from selling photos of an event due to lack of a press pass, the organization would lose and the stock agency would win as described above.

You should read the small print on tickets. (And also do some research on non-US laws.)

He doesn't know there's anything furth of the US.

« Reply #13 on: November 03, 2017, 16:30 »
+1
Thank to everyone for their advices.
The photos were taken at a public event. It was a festival organized by village people where foreigner are accepted without ticket fee. In that context I guess I dont need a Press credential.

I resubmitted the rejected photos and this time they were approved. It look as if all reviewers dont have the same rules to approve or reject photos.



« Reply #14 on: November 04, 2017, 20:57 »
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you said: "You should read the small print on tickets"

venues that print tickets are not legislative bodies, and you are under no obligation to abide by what they print on their tickets, unless you sign that you agree to it.

« Reply #15 on: November 04, 2017, 21:04 »
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you said: "In fact, I dont know what law apply when parties from 3 different countries are involve in a photo complaint for copyright, right to privacy, etc."

when dealing with international laws, you are referring to treaties that are signed between governments. such as the Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works, or with WIPO.

not all governments sign the treaty. the treaties are then ratified by legislative bodies (such as Congress) in each country. usually, if you have a copyright or trademark in one signatory country, it is either valid in all signatory countries, or it is valid if you pay and extra fee for each country you want it to be valid in.

the lack of world wide legislation negates almost all IP laws (meaning that almost everything is legal once you cross borders).

you said: "In my case the event toke place in Asia (Bhutan) and I am European (France)."

According to the IP treaties, you must first register your copyright in the place where the photo was taken, and second in the country where you live. If you have a copyright in france, because of the IP treaties, it is recognized in the US and many other countries under terms of the Berne Convention.

Copyrights are more likely to be recognized across borders. trademarks require additional fees to be paid per country you want to have your trademark in according to the WIPO treaty.

« Reply #16 on: November 05, 2017, 03:13 »
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you said: "You should read the small print on tickets"

venues that print tickets are not legislative bodies, and you are under no obligation to abide by what they print on their tickets, unless you sign that you agree to it.
By buying the ticket you are entering into a contract same way when you buy your shopping you don't have to sign anything to take it back if its faulty. Try taking some alcohol into a venue and see how far you get.


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« Reply #17 on: November 05, 2017, 05:00 »
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And which amendment of the United States Constitution ensures that stock agencies accept any and all images as long as they don't violate any laws?

« Reply #18 on: November 05, 2017, 05:02 »
0
And which amendment of the United States Constitution ensures that stock agencies accept any and all images as long as they don't violate any laws?
I guess if someone had a few million they could take it to the supreme court under freedom of expression....don't think SS will think its good use of their money mountain...they'd rather buy emerging businesses and trash them ;-).


 

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