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Author Topic: First shoot after a year off  (Read 3400 times)

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« on: April 05, 2013, 13:10 »
+13
Last April I had back surgery from an old wrestling injury.  Since my specialty is underwater photography I was out of the water for a year, unable to add to my more unique portfolio.  I finally went out on a 3-day trip to the northern Channel Islands last weekend.  I have slowly started to edit my images from that trip.  I managed to make 12 dives.  Took the first dive to get re-acclimated to everything, gear and camera.  I had my share of gear problems and camera problems.  As many of you know, field repairs require care and patience.  My housing fogged up when I went into the 51 degree water, which meant that there was moisture in my housing, either by leak or by seawater dropping off my hair.  It took three dives before I used a hair dryer to completely dry the housing and ensure there was dry air (as opposed to moist air) in the housing and any water drops were gone.  I dunk tested the housing with a rope and lowered it into the water (without a camera inside) to finally see that it wasn't leaking and the issue was resolved.  Guess it was a droplette of water from my hair.

Here are a couple of shots I took on the next few dives. These are macro shots with a 60mm macro lens and two external strobes with diffusers. If anyone here is a serious underwater photographer, they will tell you that the systems are fairly large, bulky and complicated. Once you nail a good shot, however, it's very addicting.



« Reply #1 on: April 05, 2013, 13:33 »
0
Very interesting and impressive. I have a lot of respect for people who specialise on underwater photography since it really seems to be a complicated task.

How did you get started with underwater photography?

« Reply #2 on: April 05, 2013, 13:44 »
+2
.
« Last Edit: May 12, 2014, 14:53 by Audi 5000 »

« Reply #3 on: April 05, 2013, 13:55 »
+2
Wow! GREAT images!

rubyroo

« Reply #4 on: April 05, 2013, 15:11 »
0
Congratulations on your recovery, and on your shots.  Beautiful!  :D

« Reply #5 on: April 05, 2013, 16:16 »
+2
Congratulations on your recovery, and on your shots.  Beautiful!  :D

Thanks. Still sore, just have to live with it and pop a few Aleve now and then.  Daniel, I've been diving since 1978 and became involved in marine biology as a research diver in the early 1980's.  Part of the job was photographic reconnaissance so I was somewhat forced to learn the basics.  But sometimes we had free time so I took the opportunity to use the company's camera system as my temporary toy.  I eventually got a couple of decent shots (by newbie standards) and got hooked.  One of the sr. scientists had a good buddy who was in the "diving industry", writing for magazines, speaking at travel expositions, etc.  I met him and we became good friends.  He sorta introduced me to the right people and I started also to write and speak and have since authored a book on diving.  I was a diving instructor for 20 years and have dived around the world photographing a lot of cool stuff.  Sometimes getting different stuff means being open to off-the-wall ideas.

For example, here is a shot I took of a very big barracuda.  During the morning in Honduras the dive group was boarding our boat to leave the docks to our dive site.  I saw this big barracuda swimming under our stilt lodge.  The water was green and dirty for sure.  I asked the divemaster if anyone had ever jumped in the water with it and he said since it has been hanging around for five years, nobody has dived with it.  So rather than dive with the group at some distant, pristine dive location, I stayed and gave up a day of diving to jump in the 10 feet of water at the lodge.  As soon as I jumped in it swam away, but territorial animals always come back, so I sat, and sat, and sat very quietly and motionlessly on the bottom.  After about 30 minutes I felt creeped out for some reason, so I slowly turned my head and that huge fish was inches from the back of my head.  I let it get used to me for several hours and after enough time with it, he felt comfy getting in front of my port.  Here, you can see the stilt pillars holding up the "over the water" lodge, framed by green water and big teeth.

Anyhow, enough.  I could go on forever.



« Last Edit: April 05, 2013, 16:18 by Mantis »

gillian vann

  • *Gillian*
« Reply #6 on: April 05, 2013, 17:18 »
0
OMG, what amazing shots, bless you for all that trouble to take such beautiful shots and share them here. (it exhausts me just thinking about the prep work, set up and actual shoot.)

« Reply #7 on: April 05, 2013, 17:31 »
0
OMG, what amazing shots, bless you for all that trouble to take such beautiful shots and share them here. (it exhausts me just thinking about the prep work, set up and actual shoot.)

Thank you.  Yes, lots of work, can be physically exhausting, especially in cold water.

« Reply #8 on: April 05, 2013, 21:09 »
0
WOW, your patience was rewarded. Good job.

« Reply #9 on: April 06, 2013, 00:36 »
0
Mantis, because I am a diver as well I can just say:
RESPECT
Excellent job.

Beppe Grillo

« Reply #10 on: April 06, 2013, 01:06 »
0
Very nice images Mantis!
I wish you a lot of sales!

« Reply #11 on: April 06, 2013, 07:42 »
0
Awesome shots! Respect!

« Reply #12 on: April 06, 2013, 07:44 »
0
Thanks for all the kind words.  Really appreciated.

RacePhoto

« Reply #13 on: April 07, 2013, 16:01 »
0
The cold water is good for the swelling and pain? LOL Yeah I know, but it causes it's own. Sorry I could only add one heart. Welcome back.


OMG, what amazing shots, bless you for all that trouble to take such beautiful shots and share them here. (it exhausts me just thinking about the prep work, set up and actual shoot.)

Thank you.  Yes, lots of work, can be physically exhausting, especially in cold water.

« Reply #14 on: April 07, 2013, 19:46 »
0
The cold water is good for the swelling and pain? LOL Yeah I know, but it causes it's own. Sorry I could only add one heart. Welcome back.


OMG, what amazing shots, bless you for all that trouble to take such beautiful shots and share them here. (it exhausts me just thinking about the prep work, set up and actual shoot.)

Thank you.  Yes, lots of work, can be physically exhausting, especially in cold water.

The cold water only makes me have to pee more and sooner.  In a dry suit that's really not practical, so my first stop once I hit the deck is the head.

« Reply #15 on: April 07, 2013, 19:54 »
0
Those are fantastic images! Hope you get more opportunities to dive!

« Reply #16 on: April 08, 2013, 07:26 »
0
Thank you, Cobalt.  Much appreciated.

« Reply #17 on: April 08, 2013, 07:41 »
0
Very nice! I need energy to start shooting again.

hotwalkn

  • ...I have a lens fetish...

« Reply #18 on: April 08, 2013, 10:45 »
0
Congratulations on your recovery, and on your shots.  Beautiful!  :D

Thanks. Still sore, just have to live with it and pop a few Aleve now and then.  Daniel, I've been diving since 1978 and became involved in marine biology as a research diver in the early 1980's.  Part of the job was photographic reconnaissance so I was somewhat forced to learn the basics.  But sometimes we had free time so I took the opportunity to use the company's camera system as my temporary toy.  I eventually got a couple of decent shots (by newbie standards) and got hooked.  One of the sr. scientists had a good buddy who was in the "diving industry", writing for magazines, speaking at travel expositions, etc.  I met him and we became good friends.  He sorta introduced me to the right people and I started also to write and speak and have since authored a book on diving.  I was a diving instructor for 20 years and have dived around the world photographing a lot of cool stuff.  Sometimes getting different stuff means being open to off-the-wall ideas.

For example, here is a shot I took of a very big barracuda.  During the morning in Honduras the dive group was boarding our boat to leave the docks to our dive site.  I saw this big barracuda swimming under our stilt lodge.  The water was green and dirty for sure.  I asked the divemaster if anyone had ever jumped in the water with it and he said since it has been hanging around for five years, nobody has dived with it.  So rather than dive with the group at some distant, pristine dive location, I stayed and gave up a day of diving to jump in the 10 feet of water at the lodge.  As soon as I jumped in it swam away, but territorial animals always come back, so I sat, and sat, and sat very quietly and motionlessly on the bottom.  After about 30 minutes I felt creeped out for some reason, so I slowly turned my head and that huge fish was inches from the back of my head.  I let it get used to me for several hours and after enough time with it, he felt comfy getting in front of my port.  Here, you can see the stilt pillars holding up the "over the water" lodge, framed by green water and big teeth.

Anyhow, enough.  I could go on forever.

When I first moved to Key West - diving near Barracuda was unnerving, to say the least, but eventually I began to stalk them! :)
I would much rather be faced with a small shark coming at me than a Barracuda. At least I can see the shark coming. LOL Cuda's are way to fast! Don't wear shiny things, as they will mistake you for food. LOL


 

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