pancakes

MicrostockGroup Sponsors


Author Topic: Shooting tethered  (Read 6672 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

donding

  • Think before you speak
« on: January 17, 2010, 21:29 »
0
Any of you shot tethered. I never have but was doing research on it and here are a few sites with pretty good explanation and tethering software..

http://www.scottkelby.com/blog/2008/archives/1207

http://thephotogeek.com/choosing-nikon-dslr-camera-tethered-shooting-software/#DIYPhotobits

I've never tryed it but I'd sure like the ability to see those images on a computor monitor



« Reply #1 on: January 18, 2010, 04:40 »
0
We had a thread about this not long ago.

« Reply #2 on: January 18, 2010, 05:08 »
0
Any of you shot tethered. I never have but was doing research on it and here are a few sites with pretty good explanation and tethering software..

http://www.scottkelby.com/blog/2008/archives/1207

http://thephotogeek.com/choosing-nikon-dslr-camera-tethered-shooting-software/#DIYPhotobits

I've never tryed it but I'd sure like the ability to see those images on a computor monitor


I use it all the time, it works well for indoor shots, isolated objects and the like :)

You can buffer the shots until u see what u like, then start saving to Lightroom, which is great  :D


« Reply #3 on: January 18, 2010, 06:02 »
0

« Reply #4 on: January 18, 2010, 10:15 »
0
The thing to think about is .. will a given procedure increase your productivity?

Take these examples. A portrait photographer can transmit during a session to a workstation that is being manned by a retoucher who keeps up with the flow, selecting the best shots and preparing them for the sales presentation. Moments after the client has finished the session and gathered up their belongings the sales presentation is ready to go and the photographer increases their sales by keeping the excitement of the day flowing non-stop and leaving them less time to think about their other bills, etc. In this case the method is an awesome idea.

Now take a photographer who is working alone shooting stock products. They take a few shots .. stop to go look at the monitor and flip through what they took .. go back and shoot more .. go back and flip through what they are doing .. they do this again and again. That's a lot of time totally wasted simply because they are not familiar with their equipment, technique or just don't have a well-planned out strategy of what they are doing. In this case the photographer should work on their skill by forcing themselves to get the shot without running in circles. Sit down and really put some mental effort into determining what makes a good composition, how to get a dead on exposure 99% of the time, etc. Then when it comes time to do a shoot, their productivity is efficient. They get the job done and slam out more high end photos in less time. Takes a lot of determination but in the long run it pays off.

Just my opinion but then again I don't even bother looking at the LCD on the camera when shooting. I can see tethering working in given situations provided that it is increasing productivity and not slowing you down and developing lazy habits.

donding

  • Think before you speak
« Reply #5 on: January 18, 2010, 10:55 »
0
I personally shoot a bunch of shots then have to sit at the computor to sort through them to decide which shot is the best then go through editing. I would perfer to see the shots as I take them so I can see which ones are useable and be able to change what ever it is I'm doing wrong right then and there. For me I think it would be more helpful. I would have that monitor next to the area I'm shooting at. I would be using it to do stock not studio.

« Reply #6 on: January 18, 2010, 11:25 »
0
learn to see it in your head .. be one with the stock  ;)

« Reply #7 on: January 18, 2010, 11:40 »
0
Now take a photographer who is working alone shooting stock products. They take a few shots .. stop to go look at the monitor and flip through what they took .. go back and shoot more .. go back and flip through what they are doing .. they do this again and again.

Sorry, I don't agree with you. Tethered shooting allows me to shoot much faster, and in the post everything is much easier because I already have seen the image on a larger screen and already know the issues with each image. Much better than some nasty suprises.

One thing I haven't been able to see in camera's tiny screen is the depth of field. For example it's really difficult to judge if stopping down would benefit the image or not. When shooting tethered it's very easy.

That's a lot of time totally wasted simply because they are not familiar with their equipment, technique or just don't have a well-planned out strategy of what they are doing. In this case the photographer should work on their skill by forcing themselves to get the shot without running in circles. Sit down and really put some mental effort into determining what makes a good composition,

Yes, but what if you COMBINE skill and tethered shooting?

Just my opinion but then again I don't even bother looking at the LCD on the camera when shooting. I can see tethering working in given situations provided that it is increasing productivity and not slowing you down and developing lazy habits.

Tethered shooting really increases productivity for me, I get my "keeper" much faster. Lazy habits? Maybe... :)
« Last Edit: January 18, 2010, 11:43 by Perry »

donding

  • Think before you speak
« Reply #8 on: January 18, 2010, 11:42 »
0
learn to see it in your head .. be one with the stock  ;)
The proper composition I can do....a least most of the time.. :), it's the lighting and proper point of focus I have sometimes have a problem with. They look right on the LCD on the camera but alot of times when looking at them at full view they don't look as good on the monitor. It is time consuming for me to have to zoom in on the camera. Maybe it's my computor monitor. Never really thought of that untill just now. I do calibrate it with Huey.

« Reply #9 on: January 18, 2010, 12:06 »
0
One thing I haven't been able to see in camera's tiny screen is the depth of field. For example it's really difficult to judge if stopping down would benefit the image or not. When shooting tethered it's very easy.

I suppose it has to do with when and how you learn. When I learned photography there was no LCD on the body, computer monitors, etc. We used mental mathematics right before we clicked the shutter to determine our DOF, exposure, everything. You just learned to know your result before actually seeing your result and after awhile it just becomes nature to see the final image in your head.

Like I said tethering can be useful in a given situation. A person just doesn't want to get to the point where they have to rely on a process because then it only holds them back.

« Reply #10 on: January 18, 2010, 12:12 »
0
I suppose it has to do with when and how you learn. When I learned photography there was no LCD on the body, computer monitors, etc. We used mental mathematics right before we clicked the shutter to determine our DOF, exposure, everything. You just learned to know your result before actually seeing your result and after awhile it just becomes nature to see the final image in your head.

Yes, I know the principles and even the mathematics. And I have also gone the film route. The problem is that you can't calculate the FEEL of the image. Who knows - maybe some of your images would have been even better if you had opened your aperture stops. But you can never know because you don't even try :D
« Last Edit: January 18, 2010, 12:14 by Perry »

donding

  • Think before you speak
« Reply #11 on: January 18, 2010, 12:17 »
0
One thing I haven't been able to see in camera's tiny screen is the depth of field. For example it's really difficult to judge if stopping down would benefit the image or not. When shooting tethered it's very easy.

I suppose it has to do with when and how you learn. When I learned photography there was no LCD on the body, computer monitors, etc. We used mental mathematics right before we clicked the shutter to determine our DOF, exposure, everything. You just learned to know your result before actually seeing your result and after awhile it just becomes nature to see the final image in your head.

Like I said tethering can be useful in a given situation. A person just doesn't want to get to the point where they have to rely on a process because then it only holds them back.
Sorry forgot to type. I never use the LCD except to preview. As for candid shots obviuosly you'd have to shoot from the hip. I agree you have to have the ability to do that. I just wish I could do that with the stock, but I can't seem to do it.
« Last Edit: January 18, 2010, 12:19 by donding »

« Reply #12 on: January 18, 2010, 12:18 »
0
I use a combination of both...I get the "feel" for the shot while I am composing and shooting. I shoot tethered and double-check my point of focus and technical aspects using the software before I tear down for a new shoot.

RT


« Reply #13 on: January 18, 2010, 12:21 »
0
When I learned photography there was no LCD on the body, computer monitors, etc. We used mental mathematics right before we clicked the shutter to determine our DOF, exposure, everything.

Luckily in the early sixties they invented the exposure meter and then everyone used them, when I did my three year photography course before the advent of digital everyone used exposure meters as well, and we even had one of those new fandangled flash thingy's where you didn't need to replace the bulb every time.

As for shooting tethered, I often shoot thethered and if you go into any top level professional studio and you'll find they also shoot tethered (cable or wireless) I wonder why they do that, guess were all lazy!

« Reply #14 on: January 18, 2010, 12:25 »
0
 Hi All,

 No, It is to slow for me. We shoot tethered on our motion work sometimes but that slows things down as well especially if you move around a lot on your shoots which I do a great deal of. I think it just needs to fit your style.

Best,
Jonathan

donding

  • Think before you speak
« Reply #15 on: January 18, 2010, 12:28 »
0
I think I'll give it a try just to see what happens. I may and may not like it, but unless I try it I'll never know.

« Reply #16 on: January 18, 2010, 12:33 »
0

Luckily in the early sixties they invented the exposure meter and then everyone used them, when I did my three year photography course before the advent of digital everyone used exposure meters as well, and we even had one of those new fandangled flash thingy's where you didn't need to replace the bulb every time.


fandangled flash thingy's  .. LOL nice one  ;D ... ok that's it I'm bustin out the brownie box


« Reply #17 on: January 18, 2010, 13:20 »
0
Quote
I think I'll give it a try just to see what happens. I may and may not like it, but unless I try it I'll never know.

That would be a good idea. Everybody's workflow is different, and if you ask 10 people you will get 10 different opinions on the correct way to do things.  :D

« Reply #18 on: January 18, 2010, 23:56 »
0
I don't shot tethered unless you consider the fact that I'm married  ;D

Seems to work out okay for this fellow though [youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S_hcHEWNChY&feature=related[/youtube]

« Reply #19 on: January 19, 2010, 09:39 »
0
Luckily in the early sixties they invented the exposure meter and then everyone used them, when I did my three year photography course before the advent of digital everyone used exposure meters as well, and we even had one of those new fandangled flash thingy's where you didn't need to replace the bulb every time.

Didn't those flash things blind the bird inside the magic box chipping away at the rock plate?

« Reply #20 on: January 19, 2010, 10:28 »
0
Luckily in the early sixties they invented the exposure meter and then everyone used them, when I did my three year photography course before the advent of digital everyone used exposure meters as well, and we even had one of those new fandangled flash thingy's where you didn't need to replace the bulb every time.

Didn't those flash things blind the bird inside the magic box chipping away at the rock plate?

Ya know, the blinding was only temporary, but the smell form the singed feathers was nasty!


 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
49 Replies
16704 Views
Last post September 24, 2009, 00:00
by Randy McKown
6 Replies
1477 Views
Last post February 07, 2013, 17:52
by tab62
10 Replies
4911 Views
Last post March 16, 2013, 18:47
by flashon
7 Replies
3119 Views
Last post February 04, 2015, 14:59
by sharkyenergy
6 Replies
2640 Views
Last post June 10, 2020, 19:34
by Roger Mitsom

Sponsors

Mega Bundle of 5,900+ Professional Lightroom Presets

Microstock Poll Results

Sponsors

3100 Posing Cards Bundle