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Author Topic: Blocked song in YouTube  (Read 9329 times)

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« on: February 17, 2009, 17:15 »
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Today I uploaded another of my lovebird videos and YouTube deleted the sound track due to copyright - it was a song from a CD I have.  This was news to me - I thought there was nothing wrong as long as the video is not commercial and I had legally purchased the CD.

Now, how did they find it?  Maybe from info saved when I copied the song from the CD in WMP and then Movie Maker retained this information? 

Is there a way to circumvent this?  ::)

Regards,
Adelaide


vonkara

« Reply #1 on: February 17, 2009, 17:29 »
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Youtube gone wild on music copyrights. I was having a couple of DJ's as friends that have been banned. They was having superb German raves videos. All that is gone now. The only raves videos remaining are some with no images at all or only with text saying who's the artist.

As many events are copyrighted they deleted all videos showing a "party" in, last time I checked. Shortly all songs will be also I think. I have also a couple of videos with ambiance music in, they passed without a problem last year or so... I don't think they will pass next time LOL

« Reply #2 on: February 17, 2009, 20:40 »
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I saved the music file again, this time without any data, YouTube recognize it again.  I wonder if it ws for the same file name, instead of some internal information.

Regards,
Adelaide

vonkara

« Reply #3 on: February 17, 2009, 20:54 »
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I found this     [youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_lVVZsJNfDE[/youtube]  Need to "dispute" the decision
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_lVVZsJNfDE" target="_blank" class="aeva_link bbc_link new_win">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_lVVZsJNfDE</a>


There's a lot of others videos talking about this topic... just put: blocked - youtube - copyrights - audio. Those keywords as suggestion
« Last Edit: February 17, 2009, 20:56 by Vonkara »

« Reply #4 on: February 17, 2009, 21:09 »
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Thanks for the link, that is an interesting explanation!  I tried the suggested steps, using the "fair use" justification.  I don't get an error anymore, but the video is still soundless.   :-\

Regards,
Adelaide

« Reply #5 on: February 17, 2009, 21:47 »
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[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HDda_aOazMc[/youtube]

It is kind of working now.  No sound if you play from the start, but if you click of some point ahead and then restart, there is sound.  Now, where is the high quality option?  I would swear it was there yesterday.

Regards,
Adelaide

« Reply #6 on: February 18, 2009, 00:32 »
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I tried the suggested steps, using the "fair use" justification.

In that case HeroTurko could claim "fair use" too. Pardon my French, but I don't see much difference between putting uncopyrighted music or uncopyrighted images online.  :P

« Reply #7 on: February 18, 2009, 02:06 »
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That's exactly what I was thinking. Surlely by putting it on line you are making it available for people to listen to without buying it in the same way that HeroTurko is providing our images without paying.  I don't  know for sure if that is legal or not but I'd have thought that youtube are taking that action for a valid reason.

I tried the suggested steps, using the "fair use" justification.

In that case HeroTurko could claim "fair use" too. Pardon my French, but I don't see much difference between putting uncopyrighted music or uncopyrighted images online.  :P

Microbius

« Reply #8 on: February 18, 2009, 07:31 »
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I tried the suggested steps, using the "fair use" justification.

In that case HeroTurko could claim "fair use" too. Pardon my French, but I don't see much difference between putting uncopyrighted music or uncopyrighted images online.  :P
My thoughts exactly, I can't believe that someones asking about how to circumvent copyright protection on this forum!

« Reply #9 on: February 18, 2009, 11:14 »
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* don't ever use commercial music for anything outside your home
* not only you can buy music clips for legal use with your own videos, there are many free libraries available - just search for "free royalty free music"

vonkara

« Reply #10 on: February 18, 2009, 11:51 »
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I brought all my techno cd's around 20$ each. I don't see the difference between a images buyer showing our pictures on their websites and me putting this music as background on youtube

Microbius

« Reply #11 on: February 18, 2009, 12:02 »
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okay here's the difference:

A microstock buyer has purchased a license to display your image on their website
You have not purchased a license to play your CDs (even your techno CDs) on youTube.
 

vonkara

« Reply #12 on: February 18, 2009, 12:09 »
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...
« Last Edit: February 18, 2009, 12:29 by Vonkara »

« Reply #13 on: February 18, 2009, 16:18 »
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I am not redistributing the song in YouTube, it is even cropped. Can the sound be recorded from YouTube?

Regards,
Adelaide

« Reply #14 on: February 19, 2009, 02:57 »
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I am not redistributing the song in YouTube, it is even cropped. Can the sound be recorded from YouTube?

Regards,
Adelaide
Yes you can record it. You can easily download youtube videos and/or sound. Ofc you are redistributing it: everyone can hear it. Why do you think radios have to pay some licencing when they play the same songs?

When you buy a cd it usually says that you can't play it publicly. And youtube is about the biggest public out there.

« Reply #15 on: February 19, 2009, 04:49 »
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I will extend on my previous post.

If you go to videographers forums you will find this topic was discussed thousands times. The message is very clear - you can't use ANY music in your video unless it is labeled "royalty free". So music from YouTube, from the CDs you legally purchased; from movies your legally purchased; from radio, etc. is only allowed for your personal listening. You might have noticed that most DVDs have a fine text at the bottom saying "for home use only". Same applies to CDs and any other commercial music.

Many artists that aren't very well known allow their music to be used "royalty free", quite often for free. So 2 most simple options are:
* either to buy "royalty free" music (there are some "microstock" pricing level options available on the market)
* or search for "free royalty free" - although choice is less it is still decent for most clips you would place on YouTube

BTW putting any material on any website does indeed mean you re-distribute it.

These are 2 popular forums related to video:
http://forum.videohelp.com/
http://forum.doom9.org/

« Last Edit: February 19, 2009, 04:54 by MikLav »

Microbius

« Reply #16 on: February 19, 2009, 05:43 »
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I don't see how this can be difficult to understand for someone who licenses images on microstock sites.
The copyright for the music is owned by the artist and or record company. When they sell you CD or download they are allowing you personal use of the music.
You are not license to redistribute it, it doesn't matter if people can extract it or not. They are listening to it while they are playing the video and the copyright owner doesn't want it redistributed in that way.
I'm starting to see why so many people don't understand why ripping off our images is not okay. If it's so hard to get across to microstockers what licensing of intellectual property entails.....

« Reply #17 on: February 19, 2009, 17:02 »
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Yes you can record it. You can easily download youtube videos and/or sound. Ofc you are redistributing it: everyone can hear it. Why do you think radios have to pay some licencing when they play the same songs?

If people can record it, then it is a different story.  It isn't however distribution, as it is not the music only, it's a video totally unrelated to the music (unlike some videos of popular songs some fans make).  I don't think anyone wanting that song will dld my video to rip the audio, also because it's incomplete and mixed with the birds' sounds.  There are many other ways to get a high-quality audio file for free, but I understand this concern.

Radios have to pay because it's the songs that bring the listeners, and advertisers want listeners - it's a totally different story.  Is it illegal to record a sound from the radio or a video from the TV?

If someone buys an image and puts it in a website in the limited size allowed (I think all sites limit it to 800x600), he is not distributing it, unless he is not really using the image the site.  Yet, someone can download it and use it - THIS is what is not authorized. 

I'll take a look at Miklav's links (thanks for them).  It must be difficult however to find a suitable song from a totally unknown song list.

Regards,
Adelaide

Microbius

« Reply #18 on: February 20, 2009, 06:00 »
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"I don't think anyone wanting that song will dld my video to rip the audio, also because it's incomplete and mixed with the birds' sounds.
.......
If someone buys an image and puts it in a website in the limited size allowed (I think all sites limit it to 800x600), he is not distributing it, unless he is not really using the image the site.  Yet, someone can download it and use it - THIS is what is not authorized. "

It's not for you to think about how people are likely to use the music. The copyright holder doesn't want it distributed in that way and that's what matters.
The person posting an image on their site has bought a license to use the image in that way. Whether someone can take the image off and use it isn't the point. You have already breached the terms of the license you have bought the music under by distributing it with your video. In the same way that the website designer would have had they used the image on their site without buying a license from a microstock site.
Think about this way, if they allowed their music to be used by anybody making youTube videos their music would end up being associated with all kinds of undesirable activities. If you spend thousands of dollars on an artists brand, you don't want just anyone messing with it.

« Reply #19 on: February 20, 2009, 06:06 »
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You might wanna read this answer from yahoo answers:
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20081012031332AAsg3lS

RIAA would even want to make ripping a CD illegal (so you could be sued just because you made a digital copy of your cd). I think you are currently allowed to make 1 copy of your cd (not on your hard drive though).

Microbius

« Reply #20 on: February 20, 2009, 10:22 »
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Thanks for the excellent link!

« Reply #21 on: February 20, 2009, 17:24 »
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Not being able to make a copy of the CD I puchased is an absurd!  Geez, the whole world has been doing that since the LPs and cassette tapes!  The problem is not with making myself a copy of the CD, but with making it available to others who will then not buy the original.

One important aspect: nobody is going to find my video searching for "You are my sunshine" or for "Trini Lopez".  But if you try these searches you will find tons of videos either of Trini Lopez or of people playing/singing "You are my sunshine".  Are these allowed?  YouTube will have a long work deleting all unauthorized content, then...

Regards,
Adelaide


 

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