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Author Topic: Shutterstock Reviewers Beating Me Up.... Anyone Else?  (Read 168396 times)

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« Reply #75 on: May 19, 2014, 17:44 »
-1

A forgone conclusion that should have been addressrf long ago. As long as we put up with it, they will continue to demand more from us without commiserate compensation.


My god, how do you find the time to produce any images? You seem so busy constantly digging up quotes.

I will assume you are not capable of quick keyword searches.  For a reality check, you have posted 4 times more than I have in total over the last 8 years and yet you have been a member here for only one year.  Yes some of us notice that you talk out of both sides of your mouth.

Ron Date Registered: June 06, 2013 Posts: 3920 (11.297 per day)

Gbalex Date Registered: March 20, 2008, Posts:  1090 (0.484 per day)


Ron

« Reply #76 on: May 19, 2014, 17:52 »
0
Yes, its because you are constantly digging up quotes, that costs time. Seriously, as a seasoned pro, why do you bother with me? I am of no significance in stock world. I still feel sorry for you.

PS: Dont forget to dig up Poncke and Poncke V2


« Reply #77 on: May 19, 2014, 23:33 »
+1
To be honest, lately I have gone completely the opposite. When I go on one of my hikes, I put the 6D on full auto and just shoot. Come home, process, keyword and submit. Production has gone up, and I dont have to worry about settings and bringing a tripod. Just enjoy the day, take snapshots, and be happy. Yesterday submitted another 55 images from my walk to Dublin city and back, Saturday in the sun.  Processed the 60 images on Sunday when it was raining. Half commercial, half editorial. 48 approved today. The other 12 rejected for trademark. Will resubmit as editorial and done.

Ron - I take a lot of time processing my images. Much of my time is spent in viewing the image at 300% to fix any hot pixels as I cant see them in 100% view on my HD display laptop. Other than peering through the image section by section from left to right and top to bottom (in LR), I dont know any other way. Is there something different that you do to fix hot pixels ? Thanks !

« Reply #78 on: May 19, 2014, 23:48 »
+1
To be honest, lately I have gone completely the opposite. When I go on one of my hikes, I put the 6D on full auto and just shoot. Come home, process, keyword and submit. Production has gone up, and I dont have to worry about settings and bringing a tripod. Just enjoy the day, take snapshots, and be happy. Yesterday submitted another 55 images from my walk to Dublin city and back, Saturday in the sun.  Processed the 60 images on Sunday when it was raining. Half commercial, half editorial. 48 approved today. The other 12 rejected for trademark. Will resubmit as editorial and done.

Ron - I take a lot of time processing my images. Much of my time is spent in viewing the image at 300% to fix any hot pixels as I cant see them in 100% view on my HD display laptop. Other than peering through the image section by section from left to right and top to bottom (in LR), I dont know any other way. Is there something different that you do to fix hot pixels ? Thanks !

can you get your camera to map them and fill them in?

« Reply #79 on: May 20, 2014, 00:59 »
0
Ron - I take a lot of time processing my images. Much of my time is spent in viewing the image at 300% to fix any hot pixels as I cant see them in 100% view on my HD display laptop. Other than peering through the image section by section from left to right and top to bottom (in LR), I dont know any other way. Is there something different that you do to fix hot pixels ? Thanks !

can you get your camera to map them and fill them in?

Thanks Tom ! I dont know how to do it. I will look it up and hopefully find how to do it :)

« Reply #80 on: May 20, 2014, 01:55 »
+1
I am fed up with their reviewers bs, what I have online is about 20% of what I've ever submitted, I work with a tripod,very often with artificial light at high speeds, I take my good time processing, I view my images at 100% on a 24" HD Dell Ultrasharp screen calibrated every week with an X-rite device (and would really like to know what gear is on the other side...) in a controlled environment and get all sort of odd reasons about noise, focus, lights, you name it.
Reviewers get in a megalomaniac omnipotence syndrome, frankly stopping submissions and looking for other markets is making me feel much better, ms just kills creativity.
My 2 cents

Ron

« Reply #81 on: May 20, 2014, 02:23 »
0
To be honest, lately I have gone completely the opposite. When I go on one of my hikes, I put the 6D on full auto and just shoot. Come home, process, keyword and submit. Production has gone up, and I dont have to worry about settings and bringing a tripod. Just enjoy the day, take snapshots, and be happy. Yesterday submitted another 55 images from my walk to Dublin city and back, Saturday in the sun.  Processed the 60 images on Sunday when it was raining. Half commercial, half editorial. 48 approved today. The other 12 rejected for trademark. Will resubmit as editorial and done.

Ron - I take a lot of time processing my images. Much of my time is spent in viewing the image at 300% to fix any hot pixels as I cant see them in 100% view on my HD display laptop. Other than peering through the image section by section from left to right and top to bottom (in LR), I dont know any other way. Is there something different that you do to fix hot pixels ? Thanks !

Why are you looking for hot pixels at 300% if you cant see them at 100%? An image is reviewed at 100%, I do not fix anything that appears beyond 100%. Also, I downsize all my images by 50%, it automatically reduces noise and increases the illusion of sharpness (kudos to Jens). But you can use spot removal in LR and batch process all the hot pixels at once. Just fix them on the first image and then, select all images, click sync, select spot removal, and apply.

This is not directed at you: But that is what I mean with getting 23-36 cent. I am not going out of my way to get 23-36 cent. If they want to sell images for 20 cent or a dollar they get images with minimal effort. Any image sold for more is cherry on the cake. So I have less ELs and SODs, but I also dont spent hours setting up, and processing to get immaculate images.

The images pass the inspection at several agencies, so its not like I am selling inferior images. They are good images, just not with a ton of work applied to them.

« Reply #82 on: May 20, 2014, 03:36 »
+1
Ron - I take a lot of time processing my images. Much of my time is spent in viewing the image at 300% to fix any hot pixels as I cant see them in 100% view on my HD display laptop. Other than peering through the image section by section from left to right and top to bottom (in LR), I dont know any other way. Is there something different that you do to fix hot pixels ? Thanks !

Why are you looking for hot pixels at 300% if you cant see them at 100%? An image is reviewed at 100%, I do not fix anything that appears beyond 100%. Also, I downsize all my images by 50%, it automatically reduces noise and increases the illusion of sharpness (kudos to Jens). But you can use spot removal in LR and batch process all the hot pixels at once. Just fix them on the first image and then, select all images, click sync, select spot removal, and apply.

This is not directed at you: But that is what I mean with getting 23-36 cent. I am not going out of my way to get 23-36 cent. If they want to sell images for 20 cent or a dollar they get images with minimal effort. Any image sold for more is cherry on the cake. So I have less ELs and SODs, but I also dont spent hours setting up, and processing to get immaculate images.

The images pass the inspection at several agencies, so its not like I am selling inferior images. They are good images, just not with a ton of work applied to them.

Agreed Ron ! I need to make my workflow a lot leaner !

« Reply #83 on: May 20, 2014, 06:56 »
+3
Why would any agency punish your sales for the images they accepted?

In the past Istock did it, dt still does it, etc.

« Reply #84 on: May 20, 2014, 08:21 »
+3
I am fed up with their reviewers bs, what I have online is about 20% of what I've ever submitted, I work with a tripod,very often with artificial light at high speeds, I take my good time processing, I view my images at 100% on a 24" HD Dell Ultrasharp screen calibrated every week with an X-rite device (and would really like to know what gear is on the other side...) in a controlled environment and get all sort of odd reasons about noise, focus, lights, you name it.
Reviewers get in a megalomaniac omnipotence syndrome, frankly stopping submissions and looking for other markets is making me feel much better, ms just kills creativity.
My 2 cents

Reviewers are hired without seeing the equipment they will use to review images. They all work out of their homes and the sites have no way of knowing if they use color management, keep their eye glass prescriptions up to date, have adequate functioning equipment etc.

The reviews at shutterstock have always been erratic, I think they assign reviewers regionally and who you get to review your images is the luck of the draw. Some of them are great and others are dot.

If they are rejecting your images, they need to review the reviewers. It is a long standing fact that they don't bother.


« Reply #85 on: May 20, 2014, 14:41 »
+2
My illustrations get almost 100% acceptance rate, even my ugliest vectors are accepted.

But photos are really hard to be accepted. I think they're really, really, really, really expert photographers.

« Reply #86 on: May 21, 2014, 14:12 »
+1
The same thing happened to me today ---all rejections.  I doubled checked images at 100% and all were just fine, and in focus--but were rejected for noise, focus, composition--all which were accepted and sold the same day on other sites.

My feeling are hurt.

« Reply #87 on: May 21, 2014, 16:30 »
+1
Same problem here  :D
100% rejection in the last batches   >:(
« Last Edit: May 21, 2014, 16:36 by mimadeo »

« Reply #88 on: May 22, 2014, 02:44 »
+3
I'm being beaten up too, but I suspect I deserve it!  Only just got accepted by Shutterstock so "experimenting" a bit with what I upload to get a feel for what gets through.  However, I am terribly excited at getting my first sale in the first 24 hours... and for a photo taken with my iPhone....shhh, don't tell anyone  8)
I was playing around to see if iPhone photos would pass!

aly

« Reply #89 on: May 26, 2014, 21:09 »
+3
I am getting so  fed up with SS lately- today I had this title rejected for being NOT ENGLISH-
Indian Ocean waves rolling in on the sandy  beach near a rocky groyne  by the landbacked harbour in Bunbury south Western Australia on a fine cloudy autumn morning.
What is going on?? And the whole batches are rejected for same reasons-focus, poor lighting, white balance, etc. Each batch gets the same refusal. It is getting beyond a joke. Particularly when other sites accept the images. Time is wasted uploading to SS . And they must be losing money as well by these mass rejections.

« Reply #90 on: May 26, 2014, 21:16 »
+1
Well if it's any consolation used to get tons of rejections but they are falling off these days purely because:

A. I custom white balance each shooting session.
B. Manual focus everything (auto is just too inaccurate)
C. Blown highlights are avoided as are clipped blacks so hand held metering for everything.
D. Shoot everything on a tripod at ISO100

E. Most importantly I've done test shots at all apertures on the lens selections I have and found the optimum point for DOF and focus before circle of confusion sets in for each lens.

F. Never bother processing and submitting borderline photos.

G. Proper keywording so none of this keyword spam crapola.

H. A little selective sharpening (30~40% opacity) makes things look clean and clear.

And lo and behold rejections have fallen off and the ones I get I tend to agree with.  ;D

I also find small batches submitted often works wonders too. 

I tend to wait for batches to get through approval before submitting the next one that way you avoid the scattergun rejection approach some reviewers seem to use.  :-\

That's a great process unless you want to shoot anything but inanimate objects.

« Reply #91 on: May 26, 2014, 21:33 »
0
Well if it's any consolation used to get tons of rejections but they are falling off these days purely because:

A. I custom white balance each shooting session.
B. Manual focus everything (auto is just too inaccurate)
C. Blown highlights are avoided as are clipped blacks so hand held metering for everything.
D. Shoot everything on a tripod at ISO100

E. Most importantly I've done test shots at all apertures on the lens selections I have and found the optimum point for DOF and focus before circle of confusion sets in for each lens.

F. Never bother processing and submitting borderline photos.

G. Proper keywording so none of this keyword spam crapola.

H. A little selective sharpening (30~40% opacity) makes things look clean and clear.

And lo and behold rejections have fallen off and the ones I get I tend to agree with.  ;D

I also find small batches submitted often works wonders too. 

I tend to wait for batches to get through approval before submitting the next one that way you avoid the scattergun rejection approach some reviewers seem to use.  :-
nice technique.

Sent from my GT-I9300 using Tapatalk



« Reply #92 on: May 26, 2014, 22:23 »
0
I uploaded a small batch today. This is the first in about 2 weeks. I am waiting to see what happens with them but after the replies here, I am half suspecting they will get tossed. Time will tell.

« Reply #93 on: May 27, 2014, 00:42 »
+1
It's more bullying than reviewing :)

Usually I don't resubmit, but I tried to get one particular series of images accepted, just to play.

- submission 1: rejected for poor lighting
- submission 2, less contrast: too much noise reduction
- submission 3, less noise reduction: rejected for noise
- submission 4, after some acrobacies in post production: rejected for poor lighting, lighting problem, noise and composition ... Jackpot!

And this with images taken in a sunny day, late afternoon, sun behind my shoulders, tripod, ISO 100, f/11, manual focus and exposition using live view.

The point is, not only one waste time and images, but after a mass rejection, SS can send a warning, and after three can suspend the contributor's portfolio. So now a lot of people can be fired out from SS at any moment.
« Last Edit: May 27, 2014, 00:51 by Yure »

« Reply #94 on: May 27, 2014, 00:48 »
0
Same here today 100% rejected, focus issue.. and they are not!


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Resubmitted and about 30% was accepted. I made more sharpening, little over my own taste.

Yesterday two sets was 100% accepted. And same there, little more sharpening..

« Reply #95 on: May 27, 2014, 02:06 »
0
No doubt in my mind that at least some of these are automated, done-by-computer rejections. I just submitted a batch of 5 and found that the poorer ones (which still had a good range of tones) got accepted and the best one of the lot (which had a lot of silhouetting) got rejected for white balance / exposure. A second review has been requested...

dpimborough

« Reply #96 on: May 27, 2014, 04:39 »
0
Well if it's any consolation used to get tons of rejections but they are falling off these days purely because:

A. I custom white balance each shooting session.
B. Manual focus everything (auto is just too inaccurate)
C. Blown highlights are avoided as are clipped blacks so hand held metering for everything.
D. Shoot everything on a tripod at ISO100

E. Most importantly I've done test shots at all apertures on the lens selections I have and found the optimum point for DOF and focus before circle of confusion sets in for each lens.

F. Never bother processing and submitting borderline photos.

G. Proper keywording so none of this keyword spam crapola.

H. A little selective sharpening (30~40% opacity) makes things look clean and clear.

And lo and behold rejections have fallen off and the ones I get I tend to agree with.  ;D

I also find small batches submitted often works wonders too. 

I tend to wait for batches to get through approval before submitting the next one that way you avoid the scattergun rejection approach some reviewers seem to use.  :-\

That's a great process unless you want to shoot anything but inanimate objects.

Inanimate objects are my forte  ;D

It's obviously not going to be practical in all subjects

« Reply #97 on: May 27, 2014, 12:13 »
+1
Well, there it is..... They rejected the whole batch from the weekend for noise and lighting. All shot at ISO 100 and lite very precisely. This is getting old.

Ron

« Reply #98 on: May 27, 2014, 12:14 »
+1
Ever since I avoided weekend reviews my approvals seem to be ok.

« Reply #99 on: May 27, 2014, 12:26 »
0
Ever since I avoided weekend reviews my approvals seem to be ok.

The stuff that I had rejected today was submitted yesterday but reviewed this afternoon......


 

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