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Author Topic: UK Leaving EU- will this have a major impact on our MS business?  (Read 17370 times)

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« Reply #25 on: June 24, 2016, 17:29 »
+11
People in UK have their own imperial fantasies, and that's no bad, everyone has the right to have fantasies and to not be able to tell past from present. But UK is smaller and more little today. You'll get trouble with Scotland; you will lose exports and see the pound licking the ground; many financial, industrial services (hundred thousands of jobs) will flee to other countries, mainly Ireland. Actually, Ireland won the lotto yesterday.


« Reply #26 on: June 24, 2016, 17:52 »
0
Scotland: we want independence from the UK, that's worth 46 billion a year to the Scottish economy.
Scotland: we want to remain in the EU, that's worth 16 billion a year to the Scottish economy.

What a mess!
Scottish agriculture is relying heavily on EU subsidies, without it I'm not so sure if the government is willing or able to help.

« Reply #27 on: June 24, 2016, 18:00 »
+4
With the oil industry being so fragile and unpredictable I can't ever see Scotland being independent. If it went independent 2 years ago the EU would be bailing it out today like Greece as oil prices have slumped. You can't keep an economy healthy when it's main asset is oil due to it's unpredictability. I don't think the EU will allow Scotland to be a member due to the reasons above. It's asking for trouble. The people of Scotland aren't thick too and they know this!

« Reply #28 on: June 24, 2016, 18:26 »
+7
As a Brit I'm very proud of the events that took place last night. I stayed up all night glued to the TV as all the results started to roll in. The people in the UK want change. We invented parliament and democracy in the modern age and yet the EU is the most antidemocratic system put into place. If Brussels and the EU parliament were more transparent and we could elect it's members then I think us Brits would have probably have voted to remain. The EU was initially setup for a free market but year after year they imposed new laws which didn't relate to each individual country.

Both my grandparents fought in the 2nd world wars for our freedom and democratic society. They would have been proud last night if they were both around. The EU is turning into a machine state and once again it's been up to us Brits to save the day for Europe once again. Other countries will go free soon and each country will get back it's originality and freedom.

Errr, EU Parliament is directly elected by the people.  Last election was 2014.   If you chose not to vote, that's a different issue.  But then don't complain about the EU parliament you got.

« Reply #29 on: June 24, 2016, 18:42 »
+5
As a Brit I'm very proud of the events that took place last night. I stayed up all night glued to the TV as all the results started to roll in. The people in the UK want change. We invented parliament and democracy in the modern age and yet the EU is the most antidemocratic system put into place. If Brussels and the EU parliament were more transparent and we could elect it's members then I think us Brits would have probably have voted to remain. The EU was initially setup for a free market but year after year they imposed new laws which didn't relate to each individual country.

Both my grandparents fought in the 2nd world wars for our freedom and democratic society. They would have been proud last night if they were both around. The EU is turning into a machine state and once again it's been up to us Brits to save the day for Europe once again. Other countries will go free soon and each country will get back it's originality and freedom.

Errr, EU Parliament is directly elected by the people.  Last election was 2014.   If you chose not to vote, that's a different issue.  But then don't complain about the EU parliament you got.

EU parliament its a joke in a first place!!!

On the other hand...


The European Commission (EC) is the executive body of the European Union responsible for proposing legislation, implementing decisions, upholding the EU treaties and managing the day-to-day business of the EU.



Did you have a chance to vote those people in and when ?

What democratic power do peoples of Europe have to vote those people out ?

They are being officially propose by EU Council...give me a break... that is exactly same model that was used in USSR or as its being used in North Korea now no matter how you call it.

Thats called dictatorship with or without you agree on that  ;)

Definition: "Dictatorship is a form of government where a country (or group of countries) is ruled by one person or political entity, and exercised through various mechanisms to ensure the entity's power remains strong."
« Last Edit: June 24, 2016, 18:50 by Lizard »

« Reply #30 on: June 24, 2016, 19:33 »
+6
I suspect the dream of Brexiters was a result around 49:51 but in favour of REMAIN, so that they continue and gather funds for the next referendum. I am not a Brit and don't follow the British politics closely, but does this Farage guy stand for anything else? Now, that they achieved Brexit, does he have anything to live for or fight for?

London, Edinburgh, Oxford, Cambridge and the major urban centers were in favour of remaining by a wide margin. It is a slight simplification, but does that mean that most people who can consider themselves successful in one way or another were pro-EU, and most of the Brexiters felt that they are less affluent or successful because of the EU? I think in the long run, the UK will do fine, but the most of those who will do well by then, are also those who are successful now. And those who blame the EU now, might pay the highest price and won't be much better off after a few years. I think they will lose much more. Just leaving the EU is not a solution or a cure for their issues. I suspect Farage and Johnson just manoeuvred themselves onto a minefield, which was not part of their plan. I don't think they have a clue 'what to do now'.

The EU might have many faults and might need serious reforms, but no matter how you look at it, it has brought an unprecedented long period of stability and peace and as a result of that also relative prosperity.
« Last Edit: June 24, 2016, 22:11 by LDV81 »

« Reply #31 on: June 24, 2016, 19:33 »
+9
I don't see how anyone who wants out of the EU is stupid or racist. It's a silly accusation that stems from emotion and less from logic.

I can see why the UK wants out of the EU and it makes a lot of sense. The EU is not exactly transparent on its policies and it's not very democratic. Some countries are shackled to their policies and they feel that they don't have a say. If Greece wasn't in the EU, they may be in a different position than they are today.

The EU has so much influence, it's almost scary. Heavy regulation, lack of transparency,  anti-competition, protectionism and divvying up resources for its members. It works great for certain countries, but not great for countries who has certain things taken away. Britain sees the EU as a controlling empire that takes more than it gives back. Sure, Britain will suffer in the beginning, but in the long run, they'll learn to pick themselves up and sort out the mess.

« Reply #32 on: June 24, 2016, 19:43 »
+2

 Some countries are shackled to their policies and they feel that they don't have a say. If Greece wasn't in the EU, they may be in a different position than they are today.

First of all, Greece shouldn't have faked their economic data in order to get into the EURO zone. They would be much better off with the drachma. Theoretically they could abandon euro now, devalue the drachma and become more competitive, but they won't do it, because their living standards would suffer big time...

They could also stop cheating their own state, retire at an older age... But no... It is EU's fault because it transfers billions of Euros earned by working people in other countries...

« Reply #33 on: June 24, 2016, 19:50 »
0

 Some countries are shackled to their policies and they feel that they don't have a say. If Greece wasn't in the EU, they may be in a different position than they are today.

First of all, Greece shouldn't have faked their economic data in order to get into the EURO zone. They would be much better off with the drachma. Theoretically they could abandon euro now, devalue the drachma and become more competitive, but they won't do it, because their living standards would suffer big time...

They could also stop cheating their own state, retire at an older age... But no... It is EU's fault because it transfers billions of Euros earned by working people in other countries...

I agree. Greece has much deeper problems than the EU. They enjoy their living standards way too much to give it up. If the leave the EU, they'll have to get off of their asses and work harder. If they're forced to do that, Greece could potentially prosper again in the future. At the current rate, Greece is going to be all over the news again in a few years when the bailout runs out.

« Reply #34 on: June 24, 2016, 19:50 »
+3
A drop in the pound is a good thing for Britain it means that their exports to other countries will be cheaper and thus more sales for England, that is why the USA and China are always trying to devalue their currency. Every currency is rushing for the bottom and poor Japan is trying to devalue theirs but everyone keeps jumping into theirs as a safe haven thus keeping them in a permanent recession.
A weak currency is good only if you actually manufacture something and export it (e.g. China, Japan, Germany). As far as I know, the British economy is dominated by the services and banking sectors. So, a weak currency is not a good thing for the average person when most things are imported.

« Reply #35 on: June 24, 2016, 19:57 »
0
You'll get trouble with Scotland; you will lose exports and see the pound licking the ground; many financial, industrial services (hundred thousands of jobs) will flee to other countries, mainly Ireland. Actually, Ireland won the lotto yesterday.

It might be so, yes. If Ireland does much better economically than the UK, perhaps many people in Northern Ireland will want again to unite with the Republic. The EU and the effective removal of borders played an important role in the peace process in Northern Ireland.

Shelma1

« Reply #36 on: June 24, 2016, 20:52 »
+4
Well, to answer the original question, this was the worst Friday for me in years in terms of sales. Fotolia was particularly bad, but SS was awful as well.

« Reply #37 on: June 24, 2016, 21:14 »
+3
Well, hope all that "nationalist pride" was worth wiping 2 trillion off global markets in 24 hours and likely tipping world into another recession. Way to go Brexiters!

« Reply #38 on: June 24, 2016, 23:06 »
+1
Well, hope all that "nationalist pride" was worth wiping 2 trillion off global markets in 24 hours and likely tipping world into another recession. Way to go Brexiters!
It's not going to be that bad, there might be an economic slowdown, but recession is unlikely, except for the UK of course.
If you're in the market for real estate in London I would wait for a while, the prices are going down maybe 10% or more on top of the weaker pound.
UK is going to be in the picture as a cheap place for vacations, tourist industry might boom.
I would definitely not invest in the UK though.

AlexRvan

« Reply #39 on: June 25, 2016, 01:53 »
+3
Ok, the EU isn't as transparent as it should be, impose heavy regulations etc. and some people might think this is unfair. But those people shouldn't be the brits.
I guess it's safe to say that the UK had a privileged place in the EU. While some countries have taken one for the team, accepted the regulations, taxes and policies, been to hell and back for the EU idea, the UK acted like they were located in the middle of the Atlantic. No team work, only threats and complaining.

« Reply #40 on: June 25, 2016, 01:54 »
+4
It all depends on London remaining the financial capital of Europe. If the banks, insurance companies, large portion of the stock exchange move to continental Europe, UKs done.

« Reply #41 on: June 25, 2016, 03:24 »
+9
interesting view of democracy

when majority of people decide something and someone don't like it, it's isnt democracy anymore, it's racism, old age and stupidity

can anything be more racist than that statement

« Reply #42 on: June 25, 2016, 03:35 »
+2
interesting view of democracy

when majority of people decide something and someone don't like it, it's isnt democracy anymore, it's racism, old age and stupidity

can anything be more racist than that statement

Ah, I see you think a majority of voters can't be old, stupid or racist.

Noedelhap

  • www.colincramm.com

« Reply #43 on: June 25, 2016, 04:48 »
+3
I think leaving the EU is a big mistake that will cost the UK dearly, economy-wise. The EU does have major bureaucratic flaws that need to be adressed, but leaving the EU is too drastic. It will have its short-term consequences for the British people. Nobody knows whether they will come out stronger or even recover, but the uncertainty alone makes the financial markets unstable for the time being. The British people will have to sit this out until negotiations with the EU and other countries are complete and the dust has settled.

One thing I do know is that Boris Johnson or Nigel Farage are not to be trusted, especially after admitting that the claim of spending 350 million pounds on the NHS was 'a mistake'.

« Reply #44 on: June 25, 2016, 05:05 »
+9
I wonder who the little Englanders are going to blame for a possible recession and the loss of trade volume and jobs that will happen. They can't blame the EU anymore when they are out. So who's next? The Indians maybe? Or the Muslims? Immigrants in general?

What a simplistic attitude you have, the little Englanders as you so scathingly put it made up 52.1% of the population, were heartily sick of the EU project run behind closed doors with no democratic accountability, paying 1/8th of the EU budget to get little in return, to have Merkel unilaterally making decisions which affected the entire EU.

You only have to see Juncker's reaction with his pissy faced response to realise the EU is not a democratic Europe it is a unelected cartel of 28 commisioners

On the whole the British are not racist they never sent anyone to a gas chamber and have sucked up all the Eastern Europeans and out of work Spanish and Italian kids coming here because there's no work in the southern EU countries.

The UK have taken in people and only complained about unlimited migration because of the lack of affordable housing the downward pressure on wages.

With a name like Fritz maybe you should check what's happening in Germany (burning of reugee accomodation and far right parties on the rise) before crowing about little Englanders



« Reply #45 on: June 25, 2016, 05:09 »
+13
People in UK have their own imperial fantasies, and that's no bad, everyone has the right to have fantasies and to not be able to tell past from present. But UK is smaller and more little today. You'll get trouble with Scotland; you will lose exports and see the pound licking the ground; many financial, industrial services (hundred thousands of jobs) will flee to other countries, mainly Ireland. Actually, Ireland won the lotto yesterday.

Says a person who obviously hasn't got a clue about the British and what they really think.  No one has imperial fantasies.  It's history.

Do the French, Germans, Belgians, Russians, Dutch and Italians have imperialist fantasies?  Afterall they all had empires too and all violently kicked out of their empires.

At least the British left their empire peacefully and in good order and replaced it with a commonwealth of nations.

The British are fiercely independent though
« Last Edit: June 25, 2016, 06:18 by Teddy the Cat »

« Reply #46 on: June 25, 2016, 05:49 »
+2
Reading all these replies.... The vote was close enough that there will be going back and forth for a while for Brits as well for the rest of the world. One thing is certain - UK is already not so much U any more

« Reply #47 on: June 25, 2016, 08:28 »
+5
I don't want to get into a debate - had enough of that already. But this morning I was in Sainsbury's buying provisions and was helped with a couple of essentials by a lovely Polish girl. I know there are various reasons and arguments flying about on both sides but I feel ashamed of what we've done and I can't shake it off.

Mr Nobody

« Reply #48 on: June 25, 2016, 09:00 »
+3
Well, to answer the original question, this was the worst Friday for me in years in terms of sales. Fotolia was particularly bad, but SS was awful as well.

Hey someone actually addressed my question  ;)


« Reply #49 on: June 25, 2016, 09:06 »
+1
Ok, the EU isn't as transparent as it should be, impose heavy regulations etc. and some people might think this is unfair. But those people shouldn't be the brits.
I guess it's safe to say that the UK had a privileged place in the EU. While some countries have taken one for the team, accepted the regulations, taxes and policies, been to hell and back for the EU idea, the UK acted like they were located in the middle of the Atlantic. No team work, only threats and complaining.
and and net Contribution of over 3 Billion Euros second only to germany. Sounds like you are better off without us so good luck!


 

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